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  • Norwich's Men's Cross Country Coach Michael McGrane named GNAC Coach of the Year after championship season

    Norwich's Men's Cross Country Coach Michael McGrane named GNAC Coach of the Year after championship season

    • Athletics News
  • Applications are open for the June 2023 GenCyber Teacher Training Camp.

    Applications are open for the June 2023 GenCyber Teacher Training Camp.

    • Special Events
  • Norwich University's Dr. Rachele Pojednic featured in Eating Well article on the health benefits of celery.

    Norwich University's Dr. Rachele Pojednic featured in Eating Well article on the health benefits of celery.

    • Norwich In The News
  • Norwich Men's & Women's Basketball host the 25th Ed Hockenbury Classic Dec. 2 - 4 in Andrews Hall.

    Norwich Men's & Women's Basketball host the 25th Ed Hockenbury Classic Dec. 2 - 4 in Andrews Hall.

    • Athletics News
  • The 2022 Journal of Peace and War Studies is published by the Norwich's John and Mary Frances Patton Peace & War Center.

    The 2022 Journal of Peace and War Studies is published by the Norwich's John and Mary Frances Patton Peace & War Center.

    • University Publications
  • 'So Much to be Thankful for'

    'So Much to be Thankful for'

    • President's Message
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March 3, 2017, saw the unveiling of the new Norwich University Center for Global Resilience and Security (CGRS), a research center of excellence dedicated to the advancement of the interrelationships between human resilience and security in the face of global challenges.

CGRS is focused on climate change, water, energy, and infrastructure and their impact on resilience and security. The founding director is Tara Kulkarni, assistant professor of civil engineering.

At the launch event in Milano Ballroom, Distinguished Leader in Residence Gen. Gordon R. Sullivan, U.S. Army (Ret.) ’59 (pictured) didn’t mince words about climate change, saying we either pay now or pay later.

“It’s a serious challenge, and we can’t avoid it,” he said. “This, what we are talking about today, is a serious matter not to be simply wished away as mythology. It’s not a myth — it’s real.”

The center’s abbreviated name, CGRS, bears General Sullivan’s initials. The CGRS vision includes creating a “society that is strong, healthy, and secure, locally and globally, in the face of a changing climate.”

 

Stephen Pomeroy

Lecturer, School of Business & Management
Former Colonel & Aviator, United States Marine Corps

“I teach primarily for two reasons. First, I attempt to convey theoretical knowledge in a particular field and then relate that to practical knowledge through examples that will resonate with the students so they gain a deeper real world, both theoretical and practical, understanding of concepts. Secondly, I teach because I want to challenge students to think for themselves.”

“I prefer to teach the "people-side" of business and management, because leadership, management, and success in almost any human endeavor almost always boils down to successful understanding of the human dimensions involved. By this, I mean that when we better understand people and facilitate better human interactions, we are much more likely to succeed in any field.”

“Predictably, most of my graduate and post-graduate research focuses on better understanding human behavior and interactions. Particularly, I am very interested in better understanding undergraduate attrition and retention in college-aged populations and what steps may be successful in making success more likely.”

Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Director, Center for Global Resilience and Security at Norwich University

“I teach because I care. I want future engineers to be conceptually creative, qualitatively strong, and eloquent in their designs. I want them to be able to research, differentiate between fact and fiction, and make real change. I also want them to be masters of communication—written, verbal, and non-verbal—instead of hiding behind statements like, ‘I can’t write. I’m an engineer, not an English major.’”  

“My passion for my field of environmental engineering, specifically water engineering, is driven by statistics like the ones cited by the United Nations Environment Programme: That one child under the age of five dies every twenty seconds from water-related disease. It’s driven by growing up in India, where polluted skies and garbage piled up on the sides of streets are common sights. I’m inspired by the recent Swacch Bharat Abhiyan (Clean India Mission) campaigns and the calls to action at various levels for people become stewards of their lands and work together to prevent meaningless deaths by keeping our environment clean.”

“Through my scholarship, I want to learn how to engineer water infrastructure to make our communities more resilient against flooding and drought and to ensure universal access to clean water and sanitation. I seek to engineer green designs, integrating nature, and using minimal resources. My scholarship also delves into questions on pedagogical strategies, such as service learning, to provide our students the best engineering education possible.”

Architect & Program Director
Norwich School of Architecture + Art

I teach because I love the subject of architecture, and I love seeing students discover the world through architecture. Studying architecture gives a person a refined lens for looking at the world, and it is great to see students learning to look at the world through that lens. Norwich is a place where students transform themselves into skilled professionals able to contribute as citizens to making the world a better place to live in. I love seeing that transformation take place. 

At its core, architecture is about beauty and complexity of thought. In any city on the planet you can look for buildings that are proof of human aspiration. That search for beauty is what drives me. To paraphrase Buckminster Fuller, if a solution to a practical problem is not beautiful, then it really did not solve the problem.

My scholarship is focused on drawing people’s attention to ways of practicing architecture that are non-traditional. I am interested in DIY as an ethic and a practice. A question I ask is, how can a person learn how to make buildings while making buildings, without necessarily knowing how to make buildings before they start? I also perennially ask the question, if there is a punk rock equivalent in architecture, what is it?”

Norwich University Office of Communications

May 18, 2017

Corrections scholar Stephanie Maass, PhD, teaches in the School of Justice Studies and Sociology at Norwich, where she says she strives to “foster discussions, the sharing of ideas” in the classroom and broaden students’ conceptual frameworks. Her courses range from intro surveys and senior seminars to examinations of juvenile justice and corrections. During her master’s and doctoral studies at George Mason University, Maass honed a research focus on community corrections, substance use and co-occurring disorders, and organizational change. The scholar has trained corrections officers across the country on the use of evidence-based supervision practices. We recently asked Maass about her teaching and scholarship.

1. Why do you teach?

I teach to help students become critical and responsible consumers of information. I strive to challenge their preconceived notions with information they may not be aware of and guide them while they think through the realistic challenges facing our world today.

2. What drives your passion for the field?

The criminal justice system is often bleakly portrayed as a broken system plagued with corruption and high recidivism rates. I look at the system and I see potential, particularly in the corrections field. Community correction, in particular, offers a significant amount of time to work with justice-involved individuals to rehabilitate them, reintegrate them into society, and increase public safety. We only need to pay attention to what approaches work best and how to successfully implement those strategies.

3. What questions do you explore through your scholarship?

Currently in the field of corrections the adoption rate of best practices is about 33%. We know quite a bit about what works to reduce recidivism but quite a bit less about how to implement those effective strategies on a large scale. My research seeks to understand the adoption—or lack of adoption—of best supervision practices among individuals in organizations. What makes one individual or agency more likely to use best practices than another? And which practices are they likely to use over others?

Norwich News

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  • Norwich's Men's Cross Country Coach Michael McGrane named GNAC Coach of the Year after championship season

    Norwich's Men's Cross Country Coach Michael McGrane named GNAC Coach of the Year after championship season

    • Athletics News
  • Applications are open for the June 2023 GenCyber Teacher Training Camp.

    Applications are open for the June 2023 GenCyber Teacher Training Camp.

    • Special Events
  • Norwich University's Dr. Rachele Pojednic featured in Eating Well article on the health benefits of celery.

    Norwich University's Dr. Rachele Pojednic featured in Eating Well article on the health benefits of celery.

    • Norwich In The News
  • Norwich Men's & Women's Basketball host the 25th Ed Hockenbury Classic Dec. 2 - 4 in Andrews Hall.

    Norwich Men's & Women's Basketball host the 25th Ed Hockenbury Classic Dec. 2 - 4 in Andrews Hall.

    • Athletics News
  • The 2022 Journal of Peace and War Studies is published by the Norwich's John and Mary Frances Patton Peace & War Center.

    The 2022 Journal of Peace and War Studies is published by the Norwich's John and Mary Frances Patton Peace & War Center.

    • University Publications
  • 'So Much to be Thankful for'

    'So Much to be Thankful for'

    • President's Message
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