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    Cadet Joseph Marsh learns from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Walla Walla, Washington.

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    Norwich to hold 28th Annual Military Writers’ Symposium

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    Norwich welcomes 650 new students to begin the 22–23 school year

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    NU dedicates Senator Patrick Leahy School of Cybersecurity and Advanced Computing

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"Let's face it: The position of authority gives you the ability to affect change. Now the question is, is it lasting?"

NU Office of Communications

December 1, 2017

Raymond Kelly led the New York City Police Department for 14 years under mayors David Dinkins and Michael Bloomberg, becoming the city’s longest-serving police commissioner while capping a 47-year NYPD career. Between appointments, Kelly oversaw policing in Haiti for the United Nations, worked for Interpol in Europe, and led the U.S. Customs Bureau. At the NYPD, he implemented many innovations, including the push to recruit police officers with roots in 106 countries to serve one of the most diverse cities in the world. The counter-terrorism bureau he established at the NYPD in 2002 was the first of its kind for a metropolitan police force.

The author of the 2015 book, Vigilance: My Life Serving America and Protecting Its Empire City, Kelly recently visited the Norwich campus to present a Todd Lecture. The former Marine and Vietnam War veteran sat down to talk about his life and career with criminal justice majors Jess R. Hindman '19 and John L. Smith '18. The Norwich cadets from Mansfield, Mass., and Houston, Tex., kicked off the conversation.

We'd like to ask you primarily about leadership, because that's why we’re in the Corps and why we chose Norwich. Throughout your career, what's been consistent in your leadership and management style?

Kelly: It's a good question. I had three older brothers in the Marine Corps. They used to bring home their “72” gear, or field equipment, including a guide book for Marines. I probably saw this when I was 13. It’s been around since 1910. But they keep issuing new editions of it. It talks about leadership traits. The general principle is, "Hey, if you act like a leader, if you sound like a leader, if you do the things that good leaders do, you're a leader." Leaders are made. They're not born. I sort of took that to heart.

There are 14 leadership principles in that book. I have a Franklin Planner that I use. In one of the dividers, I have these 14 leadership traits. Obviously, you could write paragraphs, books, about each one of those things. But some of them are justice and judgment. How do you treat people who are working for you? What you ultimately want is respect from the people you work with. How do you get that respect? One of the ways you get it is by using these traits. There's dependability, obviously integrity, decisiveness. There's tact. There's initiative, enthusiasm, bearing, unselfishness, courage, job knowledge, loyalty, and endurance. Now, if you look at all of those, and you try and emulate them as best you can, people are going to see you as a leader. Someone who they respect. That's what I try to do. There's certainly lots of challenges, in life, challenges as a leader. But it's sort of worked for me. I know there's a lot of different definitions of leadership. But I wanted to keep it simple in my head.

That is a little bit of my leadership secret. Also, I’m a hands-on leader. I’m not a micro-manager. But I am hands on. I want to do things that enable me to see what personnel are doing, let them know that I appreciate what they do. Also, you never want to become one of the boys or girls. A lot of people don’t realize that. There’s a price to pay for leadership. The expression, “It’s lonely at the top.” Yeah. It is—at every level. Again, you want that respect. If you are just one of the crowd and become sort of one of your subordinates, they’re not going to respect you. These are some of the things that I think work for me.

Taking counter-terrorism work as an example, you were able to effect great amounts of change in the NYPD. What would you say has been your most effective method for enacting that change and getting people to do what you want?

Well, let's face it: The position of authority gives you the ability to affect change. Now the question is, is it lasting? Will people resist it? Will it somehow be undermined? Just having a position of authority enables you to initiate things. I think the respect element I talked about is what enables it to sort of take hold. You know, "This person is leading this effort. Because it's this person, I think it has merit. I am buying into it."

What are some ways that you've changed your leadership style over the years?

I think leadership to a certain degree is situational. It depends on what the work force looks like and what the immediate situation is. I think you need to be flexible in terms of how you approach it. If I have to use one word as to how I lead, I would probably say “authoritative.” I have that model because in an organization like the police department, you've got people working 24 hours a day. The department needs the structure, the people need that structure. I think in many things you have to have that authoritative style. But then there's the coach, and then there's the element of counseling people. So, depending on the situation you've got to be able to adjust to what you believe is the right leadership style. In an emergency situation, you have to use the authority that you have. People expect that. People want somebody in charge. You have to take that position. But you don't have to go around flexing that all the time.

How have you dealt with people that didn't like you or the decisions you've made and been able to move on?

You do just that—move on. I would say this, I did learn a lesson. I made a decision, and quite frankly I don't remember what it was, but it had to do with constituencies. You have to think about the [ones] you have when making a decision. I made this decision that did not incorporate the union or the union position. You work with the public, the media, elected officials, the boss, the mayor, that sort of thing. I just didn't think about the union. It came back to cause a problem.

So, I actually drew a decision wheel, and I put all these constituencies in it. "Did I think of this? Did I think of that?" So, I learned a lesson. If you have the time to do that, you want to use the capacity that you have to check in with people and see what their thoughts are. Sometimes you have to force your hand. But if you have the time and the opportunity, you check with your constituents.

Interview condensed and edited for length and clarity.

“I grew up in rural West Texas, where I endured lots of bad teaching. Whenever I would get angry at that, I always thought, ‘How could this be better?’”

Assistant Professor of Theatre Jeffry Casey is a playwright and director, who joined the Norwich faculty in July. Teaching classes on theatre, literature, writing and public speaking, he is the ”Swiss army knife” of the English department, Casey says. He directed student actors in the November 2017 Pegasus Players production of two Harold Pinter plays, “Party Time” and “The New World.” We recently asked Casey what inspires him to teach.

When I was in Kindergarten, I kept talking in class. One of the teachers tried to humiliate me by making me teach the class. It was this massively malicious sort of way of humiliating me to get me to stop talking. I think at that point, I spent the rest of my time in school, all two decades or however long it was, thinking about, Could I do this? ... Could I do this better? was always my question.

I grew up in rural West Texas, where I endured lots of bad teaching. Whenever I would get angry at that, I always thought, How could this be better? How could this be improved? Long before I ever got a chance to teach, I was thinking about pedagogy. I mean we stick people in these classes for whatever it is, eight hours a day for twelve years, and we have been doing it the same way for how long? I always wanted to imagine just any sort of different way of doing it that would make it more exciting, because I was generally so bored.

By the time I got to college, I just loved the discussions. We were talking about all this stuff. You can see all my books. I’ve got philosophy, literature, theatre, poetry, sociology. I just loved sitting down and talking about all of this stuff. It is something I actually can’t live without is that talking.

Hearing what students have to say is an important component of that. Every night during play rehearsals, a student would bring up something that I didn’t realize about the text. I think the nature of being good a teacher is just being a student with the students and discovering the text anew every time. Part of why I don’t really lecture is because I want [my students] to say things to me. Because I’m sick of my own voice. I’m sick of my own thoughts. I’m with them all the time.

BY SEAN MARKEY
NU Office of Communications

Updated February 9, 2018

From genetic engineering to digital forensics to the plays of Harold Pinter, campus labs across the sciences, professional disciplines, and humanities showcase the talent, curiosity, and impact of Norwich faculty and students. Portraits of nine diverse researchers and the labs they work in.

BY SEAN MARKEY
The Norwich Record | Winter 2018

To appreciate the transformative effect that a lab can have on a campus, consider this: Ten years ago, a storage room on the second floor of the Tompkins science building was converted into a dedicated biology lab with a $200,000 grant from the Vermont Genetics Network, a funding arm of the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health.

Since then, Dana Professor of Biology Karen Hinkle, who also serves as the associate vice president for NU’s Office of Academic Research, has been one of many faculty researchers to use the facility to advance her research. Hinkle specifically investigates the signaling pathways of Fyn, a protein known to be involved in cancer, collaborating with Bryan Ballif at the University of Vermont as a sub-grantee of his NSF-funded lab. “It’s really basic science,” Hinkle says, referring to her quest to understand fundamental aspects of those interactions.

Numerous students have been involved in Hinkle’s work over the years as research assistants or summer research fellows and now countless more will be involved, too. For the second year in a row, students in Hinkle’s spring cell biology class will spend the entire course investigating a new protein that may interact with Fyn. Hinkle says thanks to a three-year NSF subaward from Ballif’s parent grant, she is finally walking the walk of using novel classroom inquiry to teach and engage the next generation of scientists. “It’s exciting to tell [my students], and I think they get it, that this is new. No one on the planet has ever understood these relationships before.”

From genetic engineering to digital forensics to the plays of Harold Pinter, campus labs across the sciences, professions, and humanities showcase the talent, curiosity, and impact of Norwich faculty and students. Portraits of nine diverse researchers and the labs they work in.

BY SEAN MARKEY
The Norwich Record | Winter 2018

Assistant Professor of Chemistry Tom Shell is a chemical biologist who builds molecules crucial to research into targeted drug-delivery systems known as photo-pharmaceuticals. Working in his lab, Shell synthesizes molecules similar to Vitamin B12 called alkylcobalamins that bind to nearly any cancer drug and put its cell-killing powers on hold. Before that happens, however, Shell attaches a light-sensitive trigger to the alkylcobalamin. Hit the with right wavelength of light, the molecule jettisons its cancer drug, sending it on its tumor-destroying way.

Other researchers have explored triggers sensitive to UV light, despite its major drawback—our skin is very good at absorbing it. Shell was the first to build triggers sensitive to near-infrared light, which passes deep into human tissue. The scientist says his research could one day help doctors treat patients with head and neck cancers where surgeries would be unsightly, if not difficult, while minimizing damage to healthy tissue elsewhere in the body.

Shell collaborates with Brian Pogue, a physics and surgery professor at Dartmouth College’s Thayer School of Engineering and Geisel School of Medicine who co-directs the college’s Optics in Medicine Lab. “We have the light-delivery tools and the background in mouse models of cancers and human treatments, which can help. But what we lack is expertise in chemistry and synthesis and development of molecules,” Pogue says. “Tom brings the exact expertise that we need.”

From genetic engineering to digital forensics to the plays of Harold Pinter, campus labs across the sciences, professional disciplines, and humanities showcase the talent, curiosity, and impact of Norwich faculty and students. Portraits of nine diverse researchers and the labs they work in.

BY SEAN MARKEY
The Norwich Record | Winter 2018

Assistant Professor of Biology Allison Neal and biology major Joshua Sassi ’18 have spent two weeks each of the past two summers stalking the oaks and grasslands of the 5,300-acre UC Hopland Research and Extension Center in Northern California. Their quest: capture Western fence lizards by the hundreds to collect field data on a malaria parasite endemic in the reptiles. “It’s one of the best-studied natural systems that hasn’t been affected by human interventions, like antimalarial drugs,” Neal says. In all, the pair bagged close to a thousand lizards—measuring, numbering, and drawing blood samples at a field lab before releasing the reptiles into the wild. At Norwich, the researchers used microscopy to survey blood samples for Plasmodium mexicanum malaria infections and other parasites and prepared samples for DNA analysis. Neal’s research continues a long-term study of the lizard population and its parasitic interloper now entering its 41st year. The project’s data points of basic science provide valuable research that can inform future studies of disease dynamics and climate change.

Sassi focused his second season in the field and lab on an undergraduate summer research fellowship to investigate and develop a coinfection prediction model in Western fence lizards between malaria and an intestinal parasitic infection known as Schellackia. An abstract of his work earned him the university’s College of Science and Mathematics Board of Fellows Prize for research. Neal, meanwhile, recently received a $25,000 Vermont Genetics Network grant to study a parasite much closer to home—schistosomes, microscopic worms found locally in certain water-loving birds, mammals, and snails that causes “swimmer’s itch” in humans.

Field Hazards:
1. Sunstroke. 2. Rattlesnakes. 3. Barbed goat grass seeds. (Ice picks in plant form.) 4. Wily lizards.

Field Gear:
1. Sunburns. 2. Snake gators. (Josh) 3. Heavy boots and pants. 4. Fishing poles rigged with small nylon nooses, pillowcases to collect captive lizards, Norwich t-shirt, “I Will Try” attitude.

Norwich News

  • All
  • Athletics
  • Breaking News
  • Campus Life
  • Leadership
  • Norwich In Photos
  • Norwich In The News
  • Service
  • Special Events
  • Student Experience
  • Student Life
  • Student Success
  • Default
  • Title
  • Date
  • Random
  • Amrutaa Vibho is literally shooting for the stars

    Amrutaa Vibho is literally shooting for the stars

    • Norwich In The News
  • Cadet Gabriel Gaetz wins at the OCR World Championship

    Cadet Gabriel Gaetz wins at the OCR World Championship

    • Student Success
  • Cadet Joseph Marsh learns from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Walla Walla, Washington.

    Cadet Joseph Marsh learns from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Walla Walla, Washington.

    • Norwich In The News
  • Norwich to hold 28th Annual Military Writers’ Symposium

    Norwich to hold 28th Annual Military Writers’ Symposium

    • Special Events
  • Norwich welcomes 650 new students to begin the 22–23 school year

    Norwich welcomes 650 new students to begin the 22–23 school year

    • Campus Life
  • NU dedicates Senator Patrick Leahy School of Cybersecurity and Advanced Computing

    NU dedicates Senator Patrick Leahy School of Cybersecurity and Advanced Computing

    • Breaking News
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