Norwich University Office of Communications

Oct. 17, 2016

Norwich University Applied Research Institutes (NUARI) will utilize its risk resiliency response software, called Distributed Environment for Decision-Making Exercises (DECIDE), for the first time on an energy sector.

NUARI will be a featured presenter on Tuesday, Oct. 18, during the North American Electric Reliability Corporation’s (NERC) annual Grid Security Conference, held in Quebec, Canada.

The training event, entitled “Securing the Grid,” will utilize NUARI’s DECIDE platform to emulate information sharing and collaboration techniques to test sector-wide incident response and business continuity capabilities against distributed cyber-attacks across the power grid.

The event will be conducted in partnership with Utility Services Inc., a service organization specializing in NERC Compliance and Reliability Programs.

“This will be NUARI’s first cyber resiliency exercise to be conducted for the energy sector,” said Phil Susmann, President of NUARI. “We are delighted to bring a ‘front line’ war gaming capability to the energy sector and share our lessons learned from similar exercises we have conducted within the financial sector.”

The only system of its kind, DECIDE-FS® was initially designed to test U.S. financial sector cyber risk resiliency and has been adapted for use in other critical infrastructure arenas, such as electrical grids and health care. The software engages an organization by using a simulation that participants experience interactively with their peers, competitors and supply chains to simulate systemic risk.

About NUARI

The Norwich University Applied Research Institutes (NUARI) were federally chartered under legislation sponsored by Sen. Patrick Leahy (Vt.) in 2002 and are funded in part through the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Defense. NUARI is dedicated to pursuing the ideals of Norwich University founder Captain Alden Partridge to participate in the building of the nation and to prepare its graduates to protect the American way of life. NUARI builds on the university’s status as a National Security Agency Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Education.

NUARI, a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation, serves the national public interest through the study of critical national issues and the development of related educational and training programs by conducting rapid research, developing and deploying necessary technologies, and by addressing related policy, information management and technology issues to enhance a national capability for preparedness and response. NUARI accomplishes its mission by developing strategic alliances, partnerships, collaborations, and outreach programs with diverse public and private sector stakeholders, communities of governmental and non-governmental organizations, academic and research institutions, and business and industry associations and entities.

About Norwich University˜

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.     Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
Mobile: (802) 595-3613
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Norwich University Office of Communications

Oct. 19, 2016

Norwich University honors all veterans with a Corps of Cadets Review Parade with university leadership as well as special remarks from Brigadier General Jeffrey A. Farnsworth, Norwich Class of 1986. On Friday, November 11, the Norwich community gathers to honor brave men and women, both living and deceased, who have served our nation under arms, and to recognize their sacrifices in the defense of liberty and freedom around the world.

Veterans, the public, and those currently serving in the Armed Forces of the United States are cordially invited to attend the Veterans Day Observance on the Upper Parade Ground at Norwich University on Friday, November 11, 2016, at 3:15 p.m. in honor of the men and women who have served in our armed forces.

The Veterans Day tribute at Norwich will include a review, wreath laying, cannon fire in the Roll of Wars and a firing of three rifle volleys.

As this year marks the 15th anniversary of the attacks on 9/11 and the beginning of the Global War on Terrorism, the tribute will include the unveiling of a plaque in memory of the following seven Norwich men who made the supreme sacrifice during this conflict.

MAJ Charles Robert Soltes, Jr., USAR ’90
SOC Brian R. Bill, USN ’01
1LT Mark H. Dooley, VTARNG ’01
CPT Anthony Palermo, Jr., USA ’02
SGT Adam P. Kennedy, USA ’04
MSG P. Andrew McKenna, USA M’15
SGT Steven J. Deluzio, VTARNG ‘08

Our guest speaker for the tribute will be Brigadier General Jeffrey A. Farnsworth, Director of Army Safety and Commanding General of the U.S. Army Combat Readiness Center.

Brigadier General Jeffrey A. Farnsworth was raised in Vergennes, Vt. He was commissioned into the Army Corps of Engineers in 1986 after receiving a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering from Norwich University, and earned a master’s degree in Strategic Studies from the Army War College in 2007.

The uniform for this special event is the Service Class A uniform. Please plan on cold weather and dress accordingly.

Registrations are requested by Thursday, November 4. Please click here (http://bit.ly/2ecKf5X) to let us know you will be attending the dedication.

About Norwich University˜

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation’s six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
Assistant Director of Communications
Office Tel: (802) 485-2886
Mobile: (802) 595-3613
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Norwich University Office of Communications

Oct. 21, 2016

Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art continues its lecture series with Erik Sommerfeld, who will discuss his experience with design-build at the University of Colorado and collaboration with Utah’s DesignBuildBLUFF.

The lecture, free and open to the public, will run at 4 p.m. Nov. 11 in Chaplin Hall’s gallery.

Sommerfeld is an assistant professor of architecture and director of Colorado Building Workshop. He is currently teaching architecture courses focusing on green design and construction as well as computer design and architectural graphics. By 2009, he had built 10 community projects in Colorado through collaboration involving DesignBuildBLUFF, and five charitable homes in Southern Utah.

Sommerfeld received a Bachelor in Environmental Design Architecture in 1997 from University of Colorado, Boulder, and a Master of Architecture in 2001 from University of Colorado, Denver. He is the President of the3rdspace, his personal residential and commercial design firm. Sommerfeld’s work has been published in The New York Times and Architectural Record. Sommerfeld has won various AIA awards, such as the AIA YAAG Built Project of the Year for the WEEP Waterton Environmental Education Pavilion, and he was Instructor of the Year in 2014 for the College of Architecture and Planning at University of Colorado.

The NU School of Architecture + Art Lecture Series is supported by a generous grant from the Jack and Dorothy Byrne Foundation, a philanthropic organization supporting cancer research, education, volunteerism, and other charitable endeavors.. For more than 10 years, the Byrne Foundation has partnered with Norwich to bring eminent national and international architects, designers, artists, and writers to campus. All events are free and open to the public. Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art is a leader in the region and has the only National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB)-accredited M.Arch. program in northern New England.”

About Norwich University˜
Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by U.S. Army Capt. Alden Partridge and is the nation’s oldest private military college. Norwich is one of our nation’s six Senior Military Colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC).www.norwich.edu 

In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders and captains of industry, the Forging the Future campaign is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities. Norwich University will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. Learn more about the campaign and how to participate in the “Year of Transformation” here: bicentennial.norwich.edu.    

Media Contact:
Daphne Larkin
(802) 485-2886
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Follow us on Twitter @norwichnews

Norwich University Office of Communications

May 14, 2016

Norwich University celebrated Commencement today, sharing its affection, pride, and faith in the Class of 2016.

Affection for the 469 young men and women it was privileged to serve and know these past four years. Pride in their individual character, hard work, and many accomplishments.

Faith that they will apply what they learned at Norwich — about themselves, about leadership, about their chosen field, about each other — to solve some of the many challenges facing the world today.

“We can’t wait for you to get out there and do amazing things,” Norwich University President Richard W. Schneider told the 296 cadets and 173 civilian students about to receive diplomas in 1 master’s and 32 bachelor programs.

Former U.S. Army Chief of Staff Gen. Raymond Odierno delivered the Commencement address before an audience of 4,000 at Shapiro Field House this afternoon.

He urged members of the Class of 2016 to blaze their own path and to serve the nation and others. “Give back. Give to others. Make a difference in other people’s lives,” he said. “That will be your legacy as a graduate.”

After the last diploma was handed out, a sea of Norwich cadets and black-robed civilian students hurled their white caps or pumped their fists skyward.

Other smaller ceremonies took place throughout the day too, starting with the Nurses Pinning ceremony at 10 a.m. in White Chapel. Speaking to a group of senior nursing graduates, NU School of Nursing Director Paulette Thabault told them, “We’re so proud of you.”

“We hear over and over how well prepared our [nursing] students are,” College of Professional Schools Dean Aron Temkin told them. “You guys are ready.”

Graduating nurse Samantha Nelson gave the school's class address, evoking knowing laughter as she recalled the thrill of wearing scrubs for the first time, the anxiety-inducing wait for exam results, and countless other milestones.

“We supported each other,” she said. “We made it together.”

Across campus, faculty at NU’s School of Architecture + Art held a senior show and awards ceremony for its graduating seniors and master's students. School director Cara Armstrong kicked off the celebration, telling graduates, “I know I’m going to get choked up, so I’m going to keep it brief.”

Associate professor of Architecture Danny Sagan told the assembly that the world needs architects, noting a historic shift in the past five years: For the first time in human history, the majority of the global population now lives in cities.

Architects are uniquely positioned to solve problems connected to our built environment, he said. “If there are people who are trained to make the quality of life better, it’s architects.”

Outside Chaplin Hall, unfamiliar sights bid farewell to the unseasonably cool spring. Bright sunshine, lush lawns, leafing trees, and cars parked along the Upper Parade ground. License plates spoke of celebratory road trips from Massachusetts, Maine, Rhode Island, New York, New Jersey, Iowa, Illinois, South Carolina, and beyond.

Elsewhere, at a reception for the NU College of Science and Mathematics, former U.S. Army Chief of Staff and Norwich Board of Trustees Chairman Gen. Gordon R. Sullivan '59 chatted with newly appointed Chairman Alan Deforest ’75. They stood in Weintz Courtyard at the granite foot of Norwich founder Alden Partridge, surrounded by faculty, students, and their families.

In Dole Auditorium, engineering majors were inducted into the Order of the Engineers and received stainless steel pinky rings, a symbolic reminder that lives rest on the integrity and safety of their work.

Beyond rings and diplomas and hopes and dreams and future plans, Norwich’s graduates carried something else today. They carried the things they learned here about themselves and their lives going forward.

“Norwich taught me to be a confident, independent woman,” says Shaili Patel, a civilian student who double majored in architecture and history. “It showed me that I have the capabilities to be a leader, as well as the capacity to grow and learn as a person.” Patel will begin a master’s program in architecture at Norwich this fall and will later commission as an officer into the U.S. Navy.

Samantha Thornton majored in criminal justice and served as first lieutenant in the Corps of Cadets. The former homecoming queen from Tampa, Fla., says Norwich helped her discover a remarkable inner toughness and her professional passion for helping victims of sexual assault.

“I think I learned here that you can accomplish anything—really, honestly—anything put before you,” she says. “It's a mindset. Whatever anyone throws at you, you can most certainly do.”

Olivia DeSpirito, a biology major from East Brunswick, Rhode Island, joined Norwich’s he Corps of Cadets, served on the university’s Honor Committee and traveled to Macedonia.

“What I really learned about myself here at Norwich is that you have in yourself the power to do great things—provided you don't give into pressure around you,” she said.

She starts graduate school this fall, studying forensic science to fulfill a childhood dream of becoming a forensic pathologist.

Kenneth Sikora, a commuter student from Calais, Vermont, majored in biochemistry, led the Norwich Fencing Club, and translated medieval Chinese poetry while completing the university's rigorous academic Honors Program. As an undergraduate, he investigated the differential expression of genes that influence cancers among countless other research projects.

Sikora, who plans to apply to med school, says one thing he learned at Norwich was to take a deep breath. It’s natural to be nervous in front of a crowd. The feeling will pass, often in just a minute. Then you can tell the world what you know.

For more than two decades, Norwich University social psychologist Carole Bandy, PhD, has applied her innate curiosity about how the brain works to study real-world problems. Problems such as cultural stereotyping and shooting bias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Working with colleagues on campus and around the globe, she has applied eye-tracking and electroencephalogram (EEG) data studies in novel ways. Her research has helped illuminate how the clothes people wear can activate or suppress a stereotype and how Transcendental Meditation can boost resiliency or reverse PTSD.

Bandy’s frequent collaborators include NU neuroscientist Kevin Fleming and Middlebury College clinical psychologist Matt Kimble. Combining their expertise, the researchers connect macro-level social behaviors to physiological processes happening in the brain on a micro scale.

Six years ago, the trio published a major study in the journal Social Neuroscience, which assessed how social perceptions and discrimination affect people’s decisions to shoot a gun in a weapons identification task.

Normally a comparison of how so-called “priming” photos of black and white men influence test subjects’ decisions to “shoot” a gun, Bandy and her colleagues were the first to introduce images of Middle Eastern men to the assessment.

The researchers found that clothing, not ethnicity, primed negative stereotypes. A photo of Middle Eastern man dressed in a traditional tunic and turban prompted a much higher error rate in test subjects. (“Shooting” at a photo of a hair-dryer or cordless drill, rather than another gun, for example.) While a picture of a Middle Eastern man dressed in a western suit did not.

“Clothing was the critical variable in discrimination,” Bandy says. “Stereotyping did not occur without it.” Those findings have now been downloaded countless times from Research Gate.

Since then, Bandy has continued to secure five-figure research grants and publish findings in respected journals, all while carrying a full teaching load. The achievement speaks to her drive to explore fundamental questions, even as retirement draws near. “The nature of research is that once you start down a path, the further you go with it, the more it pulls you,” Bandy says.

Many decades into that research journey, those questions have only grown more compelling. Among a raft of ongoing research projects, Bandy remains intently curious about Transcendental Meditation (TM), a practice she first encountered in graduate school over 45 years ago. She is particularly interested in TM’s demonstrated ability to reduce stress, anxiety, and depression and improve critical thinking and mental resilience.

For Bandy, the driving question is why the regular practice of restful awareness works. “Not whether it works. That much is clear,” she says. “But how? What is going in in the brain?”

In 2011, Bandy initiated a multi-year Transcendental Meditation study at Norwich using random assignment—the research gold standard—among first-year military cadets. Twenty-eight students were taught Transcendental Meditation from day one. While a control group of the same size began their meditation training six months later.

Using self-report questionnaires, behavioral and eye-tracking tasks, and EEG data, Bandy and her colleagues assessed how individuals in both groups responded to threat. Early adopters of meditation showed lower levels of stress, anxiety, and depression and better critical thinking and mental resilience. These measures improved over time as cadets continued their meditation training, results confirmed in a second study of 60 cadets the following year.

Bandy has shared this research with members of the U.S. military, which has expressed interest in TM’s potential to reduce PTSD in troops entering or returning from combat.

More recently, Bandy has collaborated in two studies with colleagues in Iowa, Rwanda, and South Africa, including the University of South Africa, to measure the effectiveness of TM to treat PTSD in Congo refugees and South African college students. Endemic violence in both countries causes high incidences of PTSD in both groups.

Among students who started TM training, “there were significant drops in PTSD in as little as two weeks,” she says. Bandy notes that by 100 days, nearly all study participants practicing meditation showed sub-threshold measures for PTSD.

Bandy theorizes that transcendental meditation works for a very simple reason. It helps people with PTSD rebalance or optimize the relationship between two areas of the brain: the cognitive frontal area and the more primal limbic system, where our strongest emotional responses, such as extreme anger and extreme fear, originate.

In the future, Bandy plans to start a longitudinal study of Transcendental Meditation at Norwich.

Susan Limberg, a Class of 2015 graduate who commissioned last May into the U.S. Air Force as second lieutenant, was among the Norwich cadets who learned meditation in Bandy’s study. She describes it one of the highlights of her Norwich experience.

“[Carole] has consistently used her experiences as a scholar to informally mentor her Norwich colleagues and to formally mentor a multitude of psychology students,” says David Westerman, a Dana Professor of Geology and Associate Vice President for Research at Norwich.

Raised in Tennessee, Bandy earned her master’s degree from the University of Memphis and her PhD in social psychology from George Washington University. She joined the Norwich faculty in 1995 after serving as principal investigator on a $250,000 grant awarded to the Norwich University Applied Research Institutes to evaluate the effectiveness of a new gunnery training system for the National Guard.

Bandy remains deeply invested in undergraduate research at Norwich, where she was hired to teach junior and senior-year thesis seminars, classes she continues to teach 20 years later. “We are probably the only department in the country that requires [a senior research thesis] of all undergraduates.”

Doing so means students “have to literally be a researcher themselves and that’s the essence of the discipline,” Bandy says.

In recognition of her innovative scholarship and teaching, Bandy was recently named Norwich University’s newest Charles A. Dana Professor by university President Richard M. Schneider. “It’s a wonderful honor,” Bandy says. “It’s the highest honor, really, that a faculty member can get here at Norwich.”

Updated August 9, 2016

Norwich University Office of Communications

September 13, 2016

It’s been a busy year for Norwich Assistant Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice Travis Morris. Recently named the director of the university’s Peace and War Center, Morris organized a NATO-sponsored advanced training course on counter terrorism in Macedonia for South Eastern Europe this past spring. He's also brought a Canadian Fulbright scholar to campus and co-led a summer trip to Israel and Palestine. The trip enabled students from Norwich and the Royal Military College of Canada to explore the roots of the Middle East conflict. All that while teaching and continuing his wide-ranging scholarship, which explores how ideas have shaped modern terrorism. His book, Dark Ideas: How Violent Jihadi and Neo-Nazi Ideologues Have Shaped Modern Terrorism is slated for publication later this year. Morris shares the backstory of nine objects from his office in Ainsworth Hall.

Great Moments in Aviation History Print
A gift from Morris’s father, a retired Air Force colonel, who taught at the Air Command Staff College at Maxwell AFB. “As a kid, I wanted to be a pilot and fly A-10s. But I didn't have 20/20 vision, so I had to let that dream go.” Morris says the poster is a nod to his father and “reminds me a little bit of growing up surrounded by aviators.”

Kentucky Colonel Certificate
When Morris was a police officer in Kentucky, his in-laws nominated him as a colonel in Kentucky’s honorary state militia. He received the certificate among his wedding gifts.

Mountain Bike
As a PhD student and father in Nebraska, Morris cycled to work to squeeze in a workout. “The problem was the wind.” Today, Morris still bikes to the office, albeit less frequently. “I don't have time just to go to the gym. So that's where that fits in.” More often he drives, dropping his kids off at school along the way.

Florida Folksong Book
“My grandfather was a fourth-generation Floridian.” His brother, Alton C. Morris, PhD, was an ethnographer who recorded and preserved folk songs and taught English at the University of Florida. Morris's grandfather constantly sang Florida folksongs to him as a child. The book speaks to the academic side of his family tree.

Miniature of Point Arena, Calif., Lighthouse
A gift from his father recalling Morris’s early childhood. The family lived on a remote USAF radar base in northern California that scanned the West Coast for the Soviet threat. “There were only several hundred people that lived on this remote mountain top. We had a doctor once a week.”

Scrimshaw Whale Tooth
Another memento from that time. Morris remembers it mostly as kid heaven. "It was like living in some outpost away from the rest of civilization—miles and miles and miles and miles of huge redwoods around us, and wild boars, and the long winding access road that made us car sick almost every time."

Carnegie Foundation Mug
Part of the grant writing endeavors Morris has taken on as director of the Peace and War Center.

Haifa Photo
Morris spent two years living in Israel with his wife and young daughter while studying Hebrew and doing research for his master’s thesis on the Israel national police. “Believe it or not, that's looking out our porch. If you turn your head slightly to the right you can see Lebanon.”

Family Photo Taken in Israel
“The girl in the middle is my little daughter, Eden. She was 6 months [old] when we lived there. She happens to be sitting on the Horns of Hattin, which is the site of a historic Crusader battle.” The 12th-century battle marked the turning point of the religious war. There’s no park, just a “small beat up metal sign at the end of a dirt path. You looked down from the battlefield to see the Sea of Galilee.”

Dennis Davidson ’82
Manager, Program Control and Integration Office

NASA Commercial Crew Program Johnson Space Center

Mention NASA and most people think of astronauts and engineers. But any space program “starts with the budget,” says Norwich alum Dennis Davidson. “Without money, nothing’s gonna happen.” During the Shuttle era, Davidson was the no. 2 in charge of business operations for the $4 billion-a-year program. Today he manages 35 staffers and an annual budget of $1.2 billion for NASA’s crewed space flight program. The program’s main thrust is vehicle development contracts with commercial aerospace companies Space X and Boeing to send astronauts to the International Space Station and on other low-Earth orbit missions. He started his de facto NASA career shortly after his NU graduation, working for five years at Johnson Space Center while wearing an Air Force uniform. Thirty years on, he helps navigate Congress’s stopgap continuing budget resolutions to keep agency missions aiming for the heavens.

What’s your job at NASA?
In government lingo, program control is all the business functions. It's procurement and contracting. It's the finances. It's IT. It's security. Public relations. Legislative affairs. Interfacing with the center legal offices. We have a lot of oversight committees, seven or eight, including an aerospace safety advisory panel. It’s also about keeping the money flowing from fiscal year to fiscal year, so that the astronauts and engineers can go do their jobs and the contracts can perform.

Are you the top guy?
I am.

What’s it like to work at NASA? Any highlights?
There was a point in my career where I had an office in the same building as Mission Control. So being there every day, walking past Mission Control Center, being aware of that history. "Houston, we've got a problem" from Apollo 13. Or "One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind." That all those words came to Houston first. Being a part of that going forward was just huge.

The second piece is just the quality of the workforce down here. I mean you come in every day and work with just awesome people, who are fun to be around, smart, [and] solving hard, hard problems every day. Being in a position to participate and at times just observe and see that take place has just been fascinating.

I've moved around to several different jobs. But I was in the Shuttle Program for the last few years that we were flying. Being a part of those last few missions, when you knew STS-133, STS-134, STS-135 were almost at the end. We finished assembling the Space Station. We were not going to fly these vehicles anymore. These were the last flights. Just knowing the importance of what was going on at that point in time and being a part of it.

What do you see when you look at the space exploration landscape today?
NASA on the whole is still doing in-house development for deep space exploration. Whether it's the robotic spacecraft that are currently operating on Mars or the Orion crewed vehicle that's being developed here that will be capable of going to the moon or to Mars. There’s also a new NASA rocket, called the SLS, the space launch system, that's going to take the Orion into space.

What we're starting to do commercially is operating in what we refer to as low-Earth orbit, so up to 250 to 300 miles. Primarily that's the International Space Station. We've got three vehicles that they're working on for cargo. Two of them are operational already. Then we're working on the two vehicles with Boeing and Space X for crewed transportation, getting us away from reliance on the Russians. The big focus outside of NASA, a lot of it is what they call the tourist industry. Those folks would take passengers up to space, but not for long.

What’s driving advances in your field and what are the big hurdles?
The big hurdle is the cost of getting things launched. A couple of companies are working on reusable launch vehicles. It's the single use vehicle—you got to build a new one every time—that drives the cost. With Shuttle, it was a multiuse vehicle. But because of the nature of it's design, it was almost as expensive. So finding a reusable way [to launch]. Both Blue Origin and Space X have working concepts to land their first stage rocket. They do the launch. They bring it back. They can actually fly it back and land it on landing legs, where you then refuel it and use it again. That will be the biggest single thing that will open up the market.

Why does exploring space matter?
The simple answer is, what if Columbus never had a desire to set sail for India? What if Lewis and Clark had never set out to see all the country of the Louisiana Purchase? What if those people had never done that? What would we have missed out on? We’re taking the human race into that next unknown. Will we ever colonize another planet? Maybe. [We’re taking] that next step. Asking, is it possible? Could we colonize another body—the moon, Mars, or anywhere else—if we needed to?

Dennis Davidson serves on the Board of Fellows advisory panel for the Norwich University College of Science and Mathematics.

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Norwich University Office of Communications

Sep 27, 2016

Learn more about C.A.S.A. 802, a modular, tiny house project designed and built by faculty and students from Norwich University's School of Architecture + Art, David Crawford School of Engineering, and construction management programs. Energy efficient and sustainably built, the $30,000 structure offers a modern alternative to mobile homes for young families and can be expanded over time.

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Norwich University Office of Communications

Sep 30, 2016

A second generation Cuban American, the acclaimed author of fantasy and science fiction novels for middle school kids discussed his work and writing process with Norwich students during two classroom visits and later while reading from his work in Kreitzberg Library. Alexander shares the idea that at the most basic neurological and human level, everything we learn is story shaped. Norwich Assistant Professor of English and author Sean Prentiss talks about the Norwich Writers Series and the power of bringing authors to campus so that Norwich students see first hand that literature is alive, that writers are real people, and that any Norwich student can become a writer. Norwich students Erick Urquieta, Brianna Hale, and Amber Reichart and Assistant Professor of Spanish Gina Sherriff reflect on Alexander's classroom visits and what they gained from the experience.


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