I expect to be dead by 2050. I hope my children will live comfortably beyond that and some of my students to the end of the century, but it seems unlikely.

American Grand Strategy seems to be going back to the future — a 19th-century one of “Great Power Competition,” that is.

During the years 1554 to 1580 A.D. in Japan, two forces known as the Sengoku Jidai (warring states) came to clash over who would control the population.

Chinese military aircraft and warships have been entering the airspace and waters around the Korean Peninsula and the seas between South Korea and Japan more frequently since late 2017.

There is a lot of discussion within today’s military establishment about Great Power competition. The most recent National Defense Strategy reflects this, as do many blogs and op-eds geared toward America’s national security professionals.

Nuclear weapons have not been used in warfare since the 1945 bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Japan. (Image by iStock.)

On Jan. 22, the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW) came into force. The fact that this treaty, which prohibits nuclear weapons, went into effect is a huge milestone for the nuclear disarmament movement.

Lincoln Memorial at night. (Image by iStock.)

Academic study of reconciliation in the last three decades has focused on converting the process of enmity to amity in virtually every corner of the world, from Europe to Africa, Southeast and Northeast Asia to Latin America.

The inauguration of Joseph R. Biden Jr. on Jan. 20 was an historic event, coming on the heels of an attack on the Capitol. The transition of power occurred amid a global pandemic with heightened security and a departing president refusing to attend.

Many examples in history highlight the brave acts of people, including those during the 9/11 attacks. On Flight 93, passengers' fates were doomed after terrorists had hijacked their plane. The last minutes of those who boarded were spent fighting back to regain control of the flight, hoping to save the lives of many more.


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