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  • Norwich's Men's Cross Country Coach Michael McGrane named GNAC Coach of the Year after championship season

    Norwich's Men's Cross Country Coach Michael McGrane named GNAC Coach of the Year after championship season

    • Athletics News
  • Applications are open for the June 2023 GenCyber Teacher Training Camp.

    Applications are open for the June 2023 GenCyber Teacher Training Camp.

    • Special Events
  • Norwich University's Dr. Rachele Pojednic featured in Eating Well article on the health benefits of celery.

    Norwich University's Dr. Rachele Pojednic featured in Eating Well article on the health benefits of celery.

    • Norwich In The News
  • Norwich Men's & Women's Basketball host the 25th Ed Hockenbury Classic Dec. 2 - 4 in Andrews Hall.

    Norwich Men's & Women's Basketball host the 25th Ed Hockenbury Classic Dec. 2 - 4 in Andrews Hall.

    • Athletics News
  • The 2022 Journal of Peace and War Studies is published by the Norwich's John and Mary Frances Patton Peace & War Center.

    The 2022 Journal of Peace and War Studies is published by the Norwich's John and Mary Frances Patton Peace & War Center.

    • University Publications
  • 'So Much to be Thankful for'

    'So Much to be Thankful for'

    • President's Message
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In April 2017, just a month after its official unveiling, Norwich University’s Center for Global Resilience and Security (CGRS) hosted its first summit, “Think Global, Act Local.” Co-sponsored by Community Resilience Organizations, the event’s offerings included inspiring presentations by local action teams, resource providers, and academic researchers on ecological solutions, water and energy resilience, cybersecurity, housing, climate, food systems, and hazard mitigation.

By Judith Stallings-Ward, Associate Professor of Spanish

July 5, 2017

Professor Judith Stallings-Ward traveled to Cuba with the Vermont Council for World Affairs between March 24 and April 3, 2017. Her trip was made possible by the generous support of a Bride Family Foundation Humanities Endowment for Faculty Development. The Vermont Council tour, which Professor Stallings-Ward undertook for the purposes of curriculum development and scholarly research, represented a unique opportunity to experience the country firsthand and to visit its museums and archives. Given the fact that Cuba remains under a U.S. embargo and no U.S. airlines fly into Havana, any visit to Cuba by a citizen of the United States must be arranged as a people-to-people tour for educational purposes.

The itinerary arranged by the Vermont Council for World Affairs involved historical, political, and cultural tours at museums, centers for Cuban studies, cemeteries, and the Hemingway home in Havana. The group also visited Santa Clara, site of the deciding battle of the Cuban Revolution in 1958 and Ché Guevara’s mausoleum, and Trinidad, the best-preserved colonial town.

Most of Professor Stallings-Ward’s research for curriculum development was carried out in Havana at the Museum of the Revolution and at the Museum of José Martí. These museums afforded access to historical archives and documents unavailable outside of Cuba, which provided valuable resources for her interdisciplinary course Spanish 350 EN La Guerilla, an exploration of guerilla movements in Latin America and the art, music, and literature that accompanied them. The course was taught as an independent study in fall 2016 with two students, and will be offered as a regular course to be taught in English in fall 2017.

Professor Stallings-Ward commented that “Cuba’s role in inspiring and encouraging guerilla movements throughout the Americas cannot be overstated. The grant I received allowed me to experience the Cuban experiment—its museums, archives, institutions, universities, archives, music, art, everyday life—and the opportunity to a gather a wealth of material and intellectual resources to bring to bear on this course, resources to which I would otherwise have no access. And, as Cuba re-opens to the West and re-admits commercial investments from abroad, it is likely that much of what I saw in Cuba will soon disappear. Any instructor teaching a course on Cuba and la guerrilla needs to visit Cuba at this unique point and time in history.”

The Bride Award also allowed Professor Stallings-Ward to conduct research in Cuba that will expand her publications on the Spanish poet Federico García Lorca. In 1929 Lorca made his first and only visit to the American Hemisphere, spending time in New York, Vermont, and Cuba. Professor Stallings-Ward has published on the poetry Lorca wrote in Vermont and in New York City. “In New York, Lorca was introduced to jazz and blues, and in Cuba to the son cubano. I want to explore how Lorca’s own spiritual growth as a human being and as a poet evolved while he was in Cuba,” she explained.

Professor Stallings-Ward also plans to use her insights gained about Cuba as a springboard for offering a series of CoLA Colloquia on Cuba during the 2017–18 academic year. She hopes to collaborate with other Norwich faculty within and outside the Spanish program, and with other experts outside the Norwich community in this endeavor. “Two of my colleagues in the Spanish Program, Professors Gina Sherriff and Kaitlin Thomas,will also be visiting Cuba very soon. In our series of colloquia, we hope to examine Afro-Cuban music, writers such as Hemmingway and Lorca who lived in Cuba, as well as Cuba and Africa, among other fascinating issues.”

By Rowly Brucken, Professor of History

In late May, sponsored by Norwich University’s Faculty Development Program, I paid a second visit to the Archive and Collection at the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York. In response to student interest, I taught a course on baseball history in the spring of 2016. The popularity of the course led me to submit a successful application to the Honors Council to create “inter-disciplinary Adventures in Baseball,” a seminar-type class for honors freshmen in the fall of 2016. I will teach that course again this fall. Using baseball as the central theme, students read poetry and short stories, learned about the game’s physics, statistics, and stadium architecture, played bat-and-ball games that might have evolved into baseball, led discussions on class readings, and wrote research papers.

A year ago, I worked with Ms. Cassidy Lent at the Hall of Fame to examine primary sources for the honors course. I photocopied scrapbooks compiled by the earliest “base ball” clubs in New York City in the 1840s, blueprints and construction records for Ebbets Field in New York and Municipal Stadium in Cleveland, and duplicated old scorecards from famous games. We found letters between President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis, including the famous “Green Light” letter in which the president approved of continued ball-playing despite WWII rationing restrictions. I utilized these and other archival sources in my honors class.

I returned to the Hall of Fame in May to obtain more historical records in preparation for teaching the history class again. I reviewed the papers of August “Garry” Herrmann (the first Chairman of the National Commission from 1902-1927), A. G. Mills (the first president of the National Association from 1877-1929), Jules Tygiel (the foremost historian of the Negro Leagues), and Landis (Commissioner of baseball, 1921-1944). The archives also possess copies of player contracts and hearings on contract disputes, records of the Official Athletic Almanac of the American Expeditionary Forces (WWI), and issues of Stars and Stripes, the newspaper of the U.S. armed forces (WWII). Given that the honors class investigated the fixing of the 1919 World Series (the infamous “Black Sox” scandal), I also reviewed newspaper articles, records of baseball’s official investigation, and financial records about the players and gamblers involved.

By John G. Dulmage ’12, Adjunct Faculty Member
NU College of Liberal Arts and College of Graduate and Continuing Studies

Kevin Fleming, Ph.D., chairman of the Psychology and Education Department, has a vision for applied psychology in a global cultural context. Beginning in fall 2016, Norwich University, in cooperation with g-Meo, a global education collaborative, and one of its consortium partners, Concordia University of Chicago, introduced Cross-Cultural Psychology at the Chengdu American Center for Study Abroad.

The spring minisemester expanded to include Social Psychology and Cross-Cultural Psychology for its second time. Summer Session 1 in June and July, in cooperation with another consortium partner, Fairleigh Dickinson University, welcomed four Norwich students (Sana Hamze ’20, Damon Watkins ’20, Morgan Chapman ’18, and Emily Johnston ’20) who will attend five weeks of class in Developmental Psychology and the flagship standard, Cross-Cultural Psychology.

Under Norwich Adjunct Faculty member John Dulmage’s leadership, these courses deliver content with a cultural emphasis. Dulmage has reached out to the Chinese service and business community, creating sustainable relationships that will enrich student academic experiences and social lives while in Chengdu.

Students have immersed themselves in Mandarin and in cultural excursions, stressing practical elements at local human service organizations. Current students have also visited Xi’an, the site of the Terra-Cotta Warriors, and the Chinese Opera, made dumplings with local Chinese families, visited the city’s historical sites, played traditional Chinese musical instruments under the guidance of Sichuan University Music Observatory students and, of course, shopped at ultramodern malls such as the student favorite, Raffles City.

Chengdu is a modern 21st century city of 14 million people, bustling with traditional values linked with newly sought westward-leaning aspirations. Students have discovered that Chinese students have much to offer the world but also are willing to learn Western values and beliefs. Also, American students can participate in many team-building sport activities while they are here. They also visit various corporate organizations as part of their professional development to investigate internship possibilities.

Following the lead of the Norwich Criminal Justice Program in recent years, the Norwich psychology program is establishing itself as a principal partner in providing student enrollment and programmatic leadership in two pivotal Norwich academic disciplines.

What is the next frontier? Simply bringing more Chinese students to Norwich and encouraging more Norwich students to enroll in the Chengdu Study Abroad Program.

The door is open…

By Amy Woodbury Tease, Associate Professor of English

July 5, 2017

CoLA undergraduates were recognized for their achievements in research and creative inquiry at the 2017 Student Scholarship Celebration, which took place during the first week of May. Over 60 undergraduates across disciplines presented posters discussing the results of their research projects at the 15th Annual Poster Session held in Plumley Armory. Among the selected participants were twenty CoLA students with majors in Criminal Justice, English, Psychology, History, and Political Science. Faculty and students from the university community turned out to support their exceptional work and engage in conversation inspired by their projects. This event culminated in an awards ceremony where Undergraduate Research Program Director Amy Woodbury Tease recognized the incoming cohort of Summer Research Fellows, including the following CoLA students and mentors: Fareed Ahmadi ’19 (Dr. Rowland Brucken), Morgan Chapman ’18 (Dr. Kyle Pivetti), Spencer Duhamel ’18 (Dr. Dalyn Luedtke), Sean Michael McCrystal ’18 (Dr. Mi Ri Kim), Ian Stephens ’18 (Dr. Yangmo Ku), Jonathan Wriston ’18 (John Hart). Undergraduate Research Fellows will be working on their projects throughout the summer, with topics ranging from nation-building to the US “pivot to Asia” to language and rhetoric to Japanese military history.

The Student Scholarship Celebration also included oral presentations by CoLA students, including: Andrea Pennock ’17 (A Millennial’s Assessment of Underage Drinking), Cody Isaiah Hubbard ’18 (The Demographic Statistics of Prison Suicide), Bradley Raabe (Prisoner Transferal: A Symptom of Correctional Malpractice), Nicole Goudreault ’18 (Criminalization of Mental Illness: The Effects on the Criminal Justice System), Shawn Robert A. Houle ’19 (Support for Intergovernmental Organizations: How Ideology and Policy Preference Affect Support for IGOs), Daniel Valdes ’17 (Public Opinion on Immigration and the 2016 Presidential Election), Nate Leach ’19 (The Honduran Effort: US Policy and Responsibility towards Latin America), and Jacob M. Markwood ’21 (The Inner Darkness: PTSD Displayed in Heart of Darkness and Apocalypse Now).

The Undergraduate Research Program will host Brown Bag Discussions featuring the work of our summer fellows, as well as other undergraduate researchers across disciplines, throughout the summer. A schedule of events will be posted on my.norwich.edu. We hope to see continued participation in these events by CoLA faculty and students!

Norwich News

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  • Norwich's Men's Cross Country Coach Michael McGrane named GNAC Coach of the Year after championship season

    Norwich's Men's Cross Country Coach Michael McGrane named GNAC Coach of the Year after championship season

    • Athletics News
  • Applications are open for the June 2023 GenCyber Teacher Training Camp.

    Applications are open for the June 2023 GenCyber Teacher Training Camp.

    • Special Events
  • Norwich University's Dr. Rachele Pojednic featured in Eating Well article on the health benefits of celery.

    Norwich University's Dr. Rachele Pojednic featured in Eating Well article on the health benefits of celery.

    • Norwich In The News
  • Norwich Men's & Women's Basketball host the 25th Ed Hockenbury Classic Dec. 2 - 4 in Andrews Hall.

    Norwich Men's & Women's Basketball host the 25th Ed Hockenbury Classic Dec. 2 - 4 in Andrews Hall.

    • Athletics News
  • The 2022 Journal of Peace and War Studies is published by the Norwich's John and Mary Frances Patton Peace & War Center.

    The 2022 Journal of Peace and War Studies is published by the Norwich's John and Mary Frances Patton Peace & War Center.

    • University Publications
  • 'So Much to be Thankful for'

    'So Much to be Thankful for'

    • President's Message
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