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BY SEAN MARKEY
NU OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

February 1, 2017

At a recent busy gathering in Kreitzberg Library, civil and environmental engineering majors in Prof. Tara Kulkarni’s Environmental Engineering lab shared project designs that addressed major water management challenges in cities across the globe. The Norwich undergraduates worked on the four-week, group projects as part of a service learning partnership with a community partner, Friends of the Winooski River, to promote water education and outreach to local high school students. Watch:

 

 

BY DAPHNE LARKIN
NU OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS

Feb. 16, 2017

Norwich University President Richard W. Schneider along with Distinguished Leader in Residence General Gordon R. Sullivan, USA (Ret.) ’59 will launch the Center for Global Resilience and Security (CGRS) with roundtable discussions focused on community resilience and security, on Friday, March 3.

The Center for Global Resilience and Security (CGRS) is a Norwich University research center of excellence dedicated to the advancement of the interrelationships between human resilience and sense of security in the face of global challenges. CGRS is focused on challenges in the areas of climate change, water, energy, and infrastructure and their impact on resilience and security. CGRS will craft creative, innovative, and sustainable solutions for building resilient communities, through inter-disciplinary research and design collaboration.

One major initiative already underway includes CGRS taking over the role of coordinating the Resilient Vermont Network from the Institute of Sustainable Communities (ISC). There are three aspects to this role:

  • Serve as the point of contact for the various entities interested in or doing resilience work in the state. The CGRS website will be set up to provide the most current information on various resilience initiatives, talks, funding opportunities, as well as collaborative research or educational activities across resilience happening primarily in the state but also outside Vermont, based on the information provided by the various groups in the network, including state agencies, non-governmental organizations, and others.
  • Offer professional development events on CGRS themes, and host relevant conferences, such as the 2016 RVT conference that Norwich University cohosted with ISC. In April 2017, CGRS will host Vermont’s Community Resilience Officers (CROs) for a day of information exchange and professional workshops.
  • Create an Academic Resilience Collaborative (ARC) within the RVT network to bring together teachers, researchers, and students, across Vermont’s educational campuses, interested in resilience related work.

The center’s director is Tara Kulkarni, PhD, assistant professor in Norwich University’s Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering and Construction Management.

Kulkarni teaches environmental engineering focused courses and serves as an academic and student club advisor. She serves on the University’s Honors Council and Undergraduate Research committee, and has led and facilitated several faculty roundtables.

She has also been the engineering instructor for K-8 teachers in the Vermont Science Initiative’s Engineering and Science Summer Academy for three years and mentors newer Civil engineering faculty through the ExCEEd workshop series run by the American Society of Civil Engineers. Her research interests are in green infrastructure, sustainable water resources management, and climate change related disaster resilience through engineering innovation. She has previously worked in engineering positions at the Florida Department of Environmental Protection and at Environmental Management Center in India, where she was involved in academic and corporate training, case study development, and writing corporate sustainability policies.

About Norwich University

Norwich University is a diversified academic institution that educates traditional-age students and adults in a Corps of Cadets and as civilians. Norwich offers a broad selection of traditional and distance-learning programs culminating in Baccalaureate and Graduate Degrees. Norwich University was founded in 1819 by Captain Alden Partridge of the U.S. Army and is the oldest private military college in the United States of America. Norwich is one of our nation's six senior military colleges and the birthplace of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). 

Norwich will celebrate its bicentennial in 2019. In fulfillment of Norwich’s mission to train and educate today’s students to be tomorrow’s global leaders, Norwich launched the Forging the Future campaign in 2014. The five-year campaign, which is timed to culminate in 2019, is committed to creating the best possible learning environment through state-of-the-art academics and world-class facilities and is designed to enhance the university’s strong position as it steps into its third century of service to the nation.

Media Contact:
Daphne E. Larkin M’17
Director of Media Relations & Community Affairs
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BY DAPHNE LARKIN
NU Office of Communications
April 17, 2017

Norwich University’s Center for Global Resilience and Security, in collaboration with Community Resilience Organizations (CROs) will hold the “CROs-ARC Summit: Think Global, Act Local,” an event to connect statewide CROs teams and academic researchers interested in participating in the new Academic Research Collaborative (ARC) on Saturday, April 29, 2017 from 8:15 a.m.-1:45 p.m.

The summit provides a day of short, inspiring presentations by local action teams (CROs), resource providers, and academic researchers (ARC), plus a noon lecture on social engagement by Rebecca Sanborn Stone, a community planner, engagement specialist, writer and speaker with expertise in resilience, local capacity building and communications.

Presentations include ecological solutions, with NU’s Simon Pearish and Lyndon State’s Ian Balcom; water and energy resilience; cybersecurity with NU’s Huw Read; and art integration. Informational showcase highlights housing, water, energy, climate, food systems, hazard mitigation, etc. from state agency experts and non-profit groups.

Peg Elmer Hough and Amanda Blank with CROs; Jared Ulmer with the Department of Health’s Climate and Health Program; Paige Heverly of Vital Communities (Energy and Transportation project coordinator); and Ben Rose, Recovery and Mitigation Section Chief, Vermont Division of Emergency Management and Homeland Security, are some of the key Vermont experts presenting at the summit.

The CROs-ARC Summit is slated to end early enough to allow participants to join the Climate Rally at the statehouse in Montpelier, scheduled from 1 – 4 p.m.

“This event is to help the CROs strengthen their teams, learn about new and existing resources and get the latest updates in areas critical to resilience and security in their communities,” Center for Global Resilience and Security Director Tara Kulkarni, Ph.D. said. “We also want to connect academic researchers to the problems facing the CRO teams and engage students in the discussion.”

Registration Fee: $35 includes breakfast and lunch. Registration deadline is April 20, 2017.

The summit is sponsored by: Catamount Solar, Vermont Community Resilience Organizations, Center for Global Resilience and Security at Norwich University, Center for Civic Engagement at Norwich University.

The Center for Global Resilience and Security (CGRS) is a Norwich University research center of excellence dedicated to the advancement of the interrelationships between human resilience and sense of security in the face of global challenges. CGRS is focused on challenges in the areas of climate change, water, energy, and infrastructure and their impact on resilience and security. CGRS will craft creative, innovative, and sustainable solutions for building resilient communities, through inter-disciplinary research and design collaboration.

When Professor Michel “Mich” Kabay joined the faculty of Norwich University’s Computer Security and Information Assurance (CSIA) program in the weeks before September 11, 2001, he was already a world-renowned expert in network and computer security. The self-professed enemy to hackers also proved to be a gifted teacher. Reflective of the thought and care he puts into his teaching, Kabay penned an essay, “On a Life of Teaching,” nearly a decade ago. We are delighted to share these excerpts.

On the Privilege of Teaching
Why do we professors willingly reduce our income to less than our graduating IA seniors earn in their first jobs? I think it’s a form of addiction. I think that a committed teacher gets such a rush seeing someone get it, after struggling with an idea or a technique, that many of us are willing to pay for the privilege of teaching. Most of us spend as much time and derive as much satisfaction from helping a D student become a C student as we do from watching an A student spread her wings and accomplish work worthy of publication. I have personally spoken to colleagues about seeing a student who walked into my office with his shoulders hunched, leave with a spring in his step because he feels better about himself for having understood something.

On Celebrating Mistakes
In over 50 years of teaching, I have never once knowingly embarrassed or humiliated a student in class or in private. On the contrary, I emphasize that making mistakes is perfectly normal. I make mistakes all the time, and announce them loudly so people will correct any misinterpretations I may have caused. When I ask questions in class, I encourage hesitant students who may have been abused by thoughtless or cruel teachers by saying, “Look—I don’t care if you make a mistake—I just want you to think and try to answer.” The students realize that I’m serious and they stop worrying about what they think of as sounding foolish. Many other teachers emphasize the same point to their students: I’ve heard colleagues say reassuringly, “It’s okay—there’s no such thing as a stupid question! Perhaps by asking your question you are helping others who haven’t thought of that particular point or who haven’t yet learned that it’s safe to ask for clarification.”

On the Value of Kindness
I explicitly insist on including values in everything I teach. My students learn about attention, critical thought, integrity, honesty, and kindness. They often hear comments about preparing for job interviews, for example: “If an interviewer uses a word you don’t know or don’t understand, say so right away. Never pretend. Never make stuff up. Anyone can learn, but a pretentious fool is a terrible employee.” I stress the importance of thinking about what we say and write: it might end up on the front page of a newspaper. And every cruel word of contempt or abuse is an opportunity lost for human kindness. I so much enjoy the friendships I have made professionally by responding courteously to requests for help over the years; it’s one of the reasons I won’t print a critical book review—I send my comments to the author but not to the publisher. I think that discussing such attitudes (and many others) is part of every teacher’s responsibility.

Devoted teachers help people learn. It’s as natural as breathing. I hope that some of you will enjoy taking those deep breaths someday. 

(Norwich Record | Winter 2018)

BY HUW READ, PHD | DIRECTOR OF ADVANCED COMPUTING AND DIGITAL FORENSICS

March 22, 2017

Back in the Fall of 2015, the Norwich University Center of Advanced Computing and Digital Forensics (NUCACDF) was successful in attracting overseas funding in collaboration with Noroff University College (NUC) located in the beautiful city of Kristiansand, Norway. The Norwegian Center for International Cooperation in Education (In Norwegian “Senter for Internasjonalisering av Utdanning” or SIU) was highly contested, with only 28 percent of proposals being accepted during the 2015 round of the “Project Funds for North America” call.

The collaborative effort between NUC and Norwich, entitled Forensic and Security Teaching Educational Resources (FASTER) is focused on developing and testing a methodology to improve the creation of practical computer-based exercises and associated teaching material in the area of cyber security and computer forensics. Such exercises will be scenario-based, with an international flair incorporating the locales of Vermont, USA and Kristansand, Norway. It is envisioned that, at the conclusion of the project, the teaching materials will be made freely available to the academic community to incorporate into their teaching and assessment.

“Many forensics cases that are created for students to work on are done over the course of a few days to a week, creating a very short time span of events and evidence that can be uncovered and examined by students,” said Rachael Little, a senior student administrator of the NUCACDF. “This project was set up with the goal of creating cases over the span of a few months, with the flexibility to add a larger amount of evidence and miscellaneous data. This will allow for creating much more realistic and in-depth cases that will include cell phone, OSX, and Windows-based hard drives.”

During December 2016, I had the pleasure of travelling with Salvatore Picheria and Little, the two lead students and NUCACDF senior admins at the Norwich end of the collaboration, to Kristiansand in Norway. The purpose was a one-week intensive face-to-face brainstorming session with Professor Iain Sutherland and his lead students, Lola Carthy and Rosalyn Arbiol.

Fighting though jetlag and the wonder of being in Norway (this was the first time for both Picheria and Little), detailed scenarios were created for the FASTER project and a plan of action for implementation and creation of the forensic artifacts for the next semester, as well as enjoying a lot of Norwegian culture! Furthermore, Picheria and Little discussed their expertise gained from administering the virtual cluster at NUCACDF with NUC senior staff, and Picheria gave an impromptu demonstration using NUCACDF’s virtualization technologies to assist NUC’s decisions for online labs.

Little describes her experience as such: “Overall, my time spent in Norway working on this project was incredibly educational and memorable. I was able to take an active role in forming the backstories and information that would make up the forensics cases with the other students and professors. We worked on the case information at Noroff University, a college of about 200 students that specializes in several IT areas. As a group we mapped out the storylines and evidence that would be placed on the various hard drives and how and whether we would hide them using encryption methods. Later on, we also spent some time exploring Kristiansand and learning about Norway in general. I had left for Norway with the hope that I would learn more about the creation of digital forensics cases and about life in another country, and that hope was greatly exceeded. It was a wonderful and informative experience, and I’m grateful for the opportunity to have worked on it with Professor Read and Professor Sutherland and the other students, and to the SIU for having funded the project.”

The next step in the project is to create the infrastructure within which we can act out the detailed scenarios, planting artifacts as digital evidence for teaching, and continuing to collaborate with NUC.

Later this semester we look forward to hosting our Norwegian partners–Sutherland, Carthy and Arbiol–at Norwich University and getting to hear about their insights into cybersecurity in Scandinavia. We hope to have a guest lecture, co-hosted by the ACM and UPE, from Prof. Sutherland and his insights in Cyber Security. Please watch the NUCACDF news site for further details.

Norwich News

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  • Default
  • Title
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  • Random
  • 'So Much to be Thankful for'

    'So Much to be Thankful for'

    • President's Message
  • Norwich students on Boston Policy Excursion learn about hurricane and disaster preparedness

    Norwich students on Boston Policy Excursion learn about hurricane and disaster preparedness

    • Student Experience
  • President Anarumo featured as part of Dartmouth College's Veterans Day Observances on Thursday, Nov. 10.

    President Anarumo featured as part of Dartmouth College's Veterans Day Observances on Thursday, Nov. 10.

    • Norwich On The Road
  • Norwich University Veterans Day observance to feature Lt. Gen. Thomas Bussiere.

    Norwich University Veterans Day observance to feature Lt. Gen. Thomas Bussiere.

    • Special Events
  • Women's Volleyball's Sarah Farnum named Setter of the Week by the Great Northeast Athletic Conference (GNAC)

    Women's Volleyball's Sarah Farnum named Setter of the Week by the Great Northeast Athletic Conference (GNAC)

    • Athletics News
  • Men's Rugby advances to NEWCRC Conference Championship on Nov. 4 vs. UVM.

    Men's Rugby advances to NEWCRC Conference Championship on Nov. 4 vs. UVM.

    • Athletics News
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