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  • Norwich's Men's Cross Country Coach Michael McGrane named GNAC Coach of the Year after championship season

    Norwich's Men's Cross Country Coach Michael McGrane named GNAC Coach of the Year after championship season

    • Athletics News
  • Applications are open for the June 2023 GenCyber Teacher Training Camp.

    Applications are open for the June 2023 GenCyber Teacher Training Camp.

    • Special Events
  • Norwich University's Dr. Rachele Pojednic featured in Eating Well article on the health benefits of celery.

    Norwich University's Dr. Rachele Pojednic featured in Eating Well article on the health benefits of celery.

    • Norwich In The News
  • Norwich Men's & Women's Basketball host the 25th Ed Hockenbury Classic Dec. 2 - 4 in Andrews Hall.

    Norwich Men's & Women's Basketball host the 25th Ed Hockenbury Classic Dec. 2 - 4 in Andrews Hall.

    • Athletics News
  • The 2022 Journal of Peace and War Studies is published by the Norwich's John and Mary Frances Patton Peace & War Center.

    The 2022 Journal of Peace and War Studies is published by the Norwich's John and Mary Frances Patton Peace & War Center.

    • University Publications
  • 'So Much to be Thankful for'

    'So Much to be Thankful for'

    • President's Message
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On a frigid day in February 2014, Laurie Grigg stood on the frozen surface of Twin Ponds, Vt., with two Norwich students and a collaborator from the University of Wyoming. At first glance it could appear that they were enjoying an afternoon of ice fishing. Instead, they were drilling through the ice into the deep, to collect core samples from the lake sediment. On September 23, 2017, the professor returned to the same lake with another group of students to collect more core samples. The temps topped 80 degrees, and the crew donned shorts.

A professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Laurie Grigg is not only used to working in extreme climates, but also studies climate change, and the National Science Foundation (NSF) has taken notice. In 2017, the agency awarded her a $132,000 grant to study the impacts of climate change on Vermont’s lakes.

Grigg’s research involves a search for variations in fossils in the sediment cores, as well as changes in the geochemistry of the sediment throughout the past 10,000 years. She will use data collected from the samples to reconstruct how the climate has changed over time, and to examine how the lake ecosystem has responded. “The goal is to use this long-term perspective, called paleoecology, to better understand the stresses facing lakes today and in the future,” she offers.

The grant supports, in part, Grigg’s collaboration with the University of Wyoming, where she and her research assistant, Irene Magdon ’18, will take advantage of the analytical equipment and expertise of a nationally recognized lab. Her work, which aligns with the mission of the Norwich University Center for Global Resilience and Security, will eventually inform future decisions concerning the conservation of Vermont’s lakes, as changes in the lake ecosystem are an important indicator of water quality. It was one of only 30 grants of its kind awarded in 2017, nationwide.

The Norwich Record | Winter 2018

BY SEAN MARKEY | NU Office of Communications

September 27, 2017

In 2012, American journalist and author Theo Padnos was captured by Al Qaeda forces in Syria, where he was tortured and imprisoned for two years. Following his unlikely release, he recounted his experience for the New York Times Sunday Magazine and later in the 2016 documentary film, Theo Who Lived.

A fluent Arabic speaker, Padnos had previously reported on Jihadi and Islamist radicalization in Yemen in the book, Undercover Muslim. An insightful thinker and writer, Padnos was invited to kick off the 2017-18 Norwich University Writers Series lecture series. He visited campus on September 26 to speak with students and give a public presentation on his work.

"Let's face it: The position of authority gives you the ability to affect change. Now the question is, is it lasting?"

NU Office of Communications

December 1, 2017

Raymond Kelly led the New York City Police Department for 14 years under mayors David Dinkins and Michael Bloomberg, becoming the city’s longest-serving police commissioner while capping a 47-year NYPD career. Between appointments, Kelly oversaw policing in Haiti for the United Nations, worked for Interpol in Europe, and led the U.S. Customs Bureau. At the NYPD, he implemented many innovations, including the push to recruit police officers with roots in 106 countries to serve one of the most diverse cities in the world. The counter-terrorism bureau he established at the NYPD in 2002 was the first of its kind for a metropolitan police force.

The author of the 2015 book, Vigilance: My Life Serving America and Protecting Its Empire City, Kelly recently visited the Norwich campus to present a Todd Lecture. The former Marine and Vietnam War veteran sat down to talk about his life and career with criminal justice majors Jess R. Hindman '19 and John L. Smith '18. The Norwich cadets from Mansfield, Mass., and Houston, Tex., kicked off the conversation.

We'd like to ask you primarily about leadership, because that's why we’re in the Corps and why we chose Norwich. Throughout your career, what's been consistent in your leadership and management style?

Kelly: It's a good question. I had three older brothers in the Marine Corps. They used to bring home their “72” gear, or field equipment, including a guide book for Marines. I probably saw this when I was 13. It’s been around since 1910. But they keep issuing new editions of it. It talks about leadership traits. The general principle is, "Hey, if you act like a leader, if you sound like a leader, if you do the things that good leaders do, you're a leader." Leaders are made. They're not born. I sort of took that to heart.

There are 14 leadership principles in that book. I have a Franklin Planner that I use. In one of the dividers, I have these 14 leadership traits. Obviously, you could write paragraphs, books, about each one of those things. But some of them are justice and judgment. How do you treat people who are working for you? What you ultimately want is respect from the people you work with. How do you get that respect? One of the ways you get it is by using these traits. There's dependability, obviously integrity, decisiveness. There's tact. There's initiative, enthusiasm, bearing, unselfishness, courage, job knowledge, loyalty, and endurance. Now, if you look at all of those, and you try and emulate them as best you can, people are going to see you as a leader. Someone who they respect. That's what I try to do. There's certainly lots of challenges, in life, challenges as a leader. But it's sort of worked for me. I know there's a lot of different definitions of leadership. But I wanted to keep it simple in my head.

That is a little bit of my leadership secret. Also, I’m a hands-on leader. I’m not a micro-manager. But I am hands on. I want to do things that enable me to see what personnel are doing, let them know that I appreciate what they do. Also, you never want to become one of the boys or girls. A lot of people don’t realize that. There’s a price to pay for leadership. The expression, “It’s lonely at the top.” Yeah. It is—at every level. Again, you want that respect. If you are just one of the crowd and become sort of one of your subordinates, they’re not going to respect you. These are some of the things that I think work for me.

Taking counter-terrorism work as an example, you were able to effect great amounts of change in the NYPD. What would you say has been your most effective method for enacting that change and getting people to do what you want?

Well, let's face it: The position of authority gives you the ability to affect change. Now the question is, is it lasting? Will people resist it? Will it somehow be undermined? Just having a position of authority enables you to initiate things. I think the respect element I talked about is what enables it to sort of take hold. You know, "This person is leading this effort. Because it's this person, I think it has merit. I am buying into it."

What are some ways that you've changed your leadership style over the years?

I think leadership to a certain degree is situational. It depends on what the work force looks like and what the immediate situation is. I think you need to be flexible in terms of how you approach it. If I have to use one word as to how I lead, I would probably say “authoritative.” I have that model because in an organization like the police department, you've got people working 24 hours a day. The department needs the structure, the people need that structure. I think in many things you have to have that authoritative style. But then there's the coach, and then there's the element of counseling people. So, depending on the situation you've got to be able to adjust to what you believe is the right leadership style. In an emergency situation, you have to use the authority that you have. People expect that. People want somebody in charge. You have to take that position. But you don't have to go around flexing that all the time.

How have you dealt with people that didn't like you or the decisions you've made and been able to move on?

You do just that—move on. I would say this, I did learn a lesson. I made a decision, and quite frankly I don't remember what it was, but it had to do with constituencies. You have to think about the [ones] you have when making a decision. I made this decision that did not incorporate the union or the union position. You work with the public, the media, elected officials, the boss, the mayor, that sort of thing. I just didn't think about the union. It came back to cause a problem.

So, I actually drew a decision wheel, and I put all these constituencies in it. "Did I think of this? Did I think of that?" So, I learned a lesson. If you have the time to do that, you want to use the capacity that you have to check in with people and see what their thoughts are. Sometimes you have to force your hand. But if you have the time and the opportunity, you check with your constituents.

Interview condensed and edited for length and clarity.

“I grew up in rural West Texas, where I endured lots of bad teaching. Whenever I would get angry at that, I always thought, ‘How could this be better?’”

Assistant Professor of Theatre Jeffry Casey is a playwright and director, who joined the Norwich faculty in July. Teaching classes on theatre, literature, writing and public speaking, he is the ”Swiss army knife” of the English department, Casey says. He directed student actors in the November 2017 Pegasus Players production of two Harold Pinter plays, “Party Time” and “The New World.” We recently asked Casey what inspires him to teach.

When I was in Kindergarten, I kept talking in class. One of the teachers tried to humiliate me by making me teach the class. It was this massively malicious sort of way of humiliating me to get me to stop talking. I think at that point, I spent the rest of my time in school, all two decades or however long it was, thinking about, Could I do this? ... Could I do this better? was always my question.

I grew up in rural West Texas, where I endured lots of bad teaching. Whenever I would get angry at that, I always thought, How could this be better? How could this be improved? Long before I ever got a chance to teach, I was thinking about pedagogy. I mean we stick people in these classes for whatever it is, eight hours a day for twelve years, and we have been doing it the same way for how long? I always wanted to imagine just any sort of different way of doing it that would make it more exciting, because I was generally so bored.

By the time I got to college, I just loved the discussions. We were talking about all this stuff. You can see all my books. I’ve got philosophy, literature, theatre, poetry, sociology. I just loved sitting down and talking about all of this stuff. It is something I actually can’t live without is that talking.

Hearing what students have to say is an important component of that. Every night during play rehearsals, a student would bring up something that I didn’t realize about the text. I think the nature of being good a teacher is just being a student with the students and discovering the text anew every time. Part of why I don’t really lecture is because I want [my students] to say things to me. Because I’m sick of my own voice. I’m sick of my own thoughts. I’m with them all the time.

BY SEAN MARKEY
NU Office of Communications

Updated February 9, 2018

From genetic engineering to digital forensics to the plays of Harold Pinter, campus labs across the sciences, professional disciplines, and humanities showcase the talent, curiosity, and impact of Norwich faculty and students. Portraits of nine diverse researchers and the labs they work in.

BY SEAN MARKEY
The Norwich Record | Winter 2018

To appreciate the transformative effect that a lab can have on a campus, consider this: Ten years ago, a storage room on the second floor of the Tompkins science building was converted into a dedicated biology lab with a $200,000 grant from the Vermont Genetics Network, a funding arm of the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health.

Since then, Dana Professor of Biology Karen Hinkle, who also serves as the associate vice president for NU’s Office of Academic Research, has been one of many faculty researchers to use the facility to advance her research. Hinkle specifically investigates the signaling pathways of Fyn, a protein known to be involved in cancer, collaborating with Bryan Ballif at the University of Vermont as a sub-grantee of his NSF-funded lab. “It’s really basic science,” Hinkle says, referring to her quest to understand fundamental aspects of those interactions.

Numerous students have been involved in Hinkle’s work over the years as research assistants or summer research fellows and now countless more will be involved, too. For the second year in a row, students in Hinkle’s spring cell biology class will spend the entire course investigating a new protein that may interact with Fyn. Hinkle says thanks to a three-year NSF subaward from Ballif’s parent grant, she is finally walking the walk of using novel classroom inquiry to teach and engage the next generation of scientists. “It’s exciting to tell [my students], and I think they get it, that this is new. No one on the planet has ever understood these relationships before.”

Norwich News

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  • Default
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  • Norwich's Men's Cross Country Coach Michael McGrane named GNAC Coach of the Year after championship season

    Norwich's Men's Cross Country Coach Michael McGrane named GNAC Coach of the Year after championship season

    • Athletics News
  • Applications are open for the June 2023 GenCyber Teacher Training Camp.

    Applications are open for the June 2023 GenCyber Teacher Training Camp.

    • Special Events
  • Norwich University's Dr. Rachele Pojednic featured in Eating Well article on the health benefits of celery.

    Norwich University's Dr. Rachele Pojednic featured in Eating Well article on the health benefits of celery.

    • Norwich In The News
  • Norwich Men's & Women's Basketball host the 25th Ed Hockenbury Classic Dec. 2 - 4 in Andrews Hall.

    Norwich Men's & Women's Basketball host the 25th Ed Hockenbury Classic Dec. 2 - 4 in Andrews Hall.

    • Athletics News
  • The 2022 Journal of Peace and War Studies is published by the Norwich's John and Mary Frances Patton Peace & War Center.

    The 2022 Journal of Peace and War Studies is published by the Norwich's John and Mary Frances Patton Peace & War Center.

    • University Publications
  • 'So Much to be Thankful for'

    'So Much to be Thankful for'

    • President's Message
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