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  • 'So Much to be Thankful for'

    'So Much to be Thankful for'

    • President's Message
  • Norwich students on Boston Policy Excursion learn about hurricane and disaster preparedness

    Norwich students on Boston Policy Excursion learn about hurricane and disaster preparedness

    • Student Experience
  • President Anarumo featured as part of Dartmouth College's Veterans Day Observances on Thursday, Nov. 10.

    President Anarumo featured as part of Dartmouth College's Veterans Day Observances on Thursday, Nov. 10.

    • Norwich On The Road
  • Norwich University Veterans Day observance to feature Lt. Gen. Thomas Bussiere.

    Norwich University Veterans Day observance to feature Lt. Gen. Thomas Bussiere.

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  • Women's Volleyball's Sarah Farnum named Setter of the Week by the Great Northeast Athletic Conference (GNAC)

    Women's Volleyball's Sarah Farnum named Setter of the Week by the Great Northeast Athletic Conference (GNAC)

    • Athletics News
  • Men's Rugby advances to NEWCRC Conference Championship on Nov. 4 vs. UVM.

    Men's Rugby advances to NEWCRC Conference Championship on Nov. 4 vs. UVM.

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February 14, 2018 – Women’s rights activist Shabana Basij-Rasikh visited Norwich University to speak about her experience as a young Afghan girl under the Taliban Regime. She also spoke of founding her home country’s first all-girls boarding school, the School of Leadership, Afghanistan. Born in Kabul, Afghanistan, Basij-Rasikh received her early education dressed up as a boy while escorting her sister to a secret school. After six long years of living under the Taliban in constant fear, she was able to attend a public school where she found herself years ahead of her peers.

Her talk was sponsored by the Peace & War Center, The Academic Achievement Center, the International Education Office, and the Center for Civic Engagement. Learn more about SOLA.

BY DAPHNE LARKIN
NU Office of Communications

Dec. 1, 2016

Norwich University was recently awarded $714,285 from the National Security Agency (NSA) in collaboration with the United States Army Reserve (USAR) in order to support scholarships for soldiers, capacity building to enhance the overall educational experience and outcomes, and to enhance local and regional community outreach and development.

“Norwich University continues to keep Vermont at the cutting edge of cyber security training and preparation. When the Appropriations Committee set up this program we knew how important cyber security is, and the threats we face from abroad, but we could not have predicted that 2016 itself would be the year of some of the largest hacks in history, many of them originating from overseas,” stated Senator Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.). “The work Norwich is doing is more important than ever, and I am proud that Vermonters are sought out by the U.S. Army Reserves to make sure their men and women are prepared to respond to threats to our networks.”

Norwich will provide scholarships to U.S. Army Reserve soldiers to enter the online graduate certificate programs for information security and assurance. The grant will also provide critical software and hardware upgrades that will be made part of the student experience.

Other investments into cybersecurity education infrastructure on the Norwich campus include improved equipment and software to enhance engagement and experiential learning. This includes improvement of virtual (online) laboratory environments.

“As the world is increasingly driven by technology, skilled cybersecurity professionals are essential to our nation’s defense,” said Rep. Peter Welch (D-Vt.). “Quality education is a key component in developing our National Cyber Mission Force. I strongly support this critical component of the mission of Norwich University and am pleased that it has received this funding for scholarships and improving the educational experience for cyber professional students.”

As a function of its role as a national leader in cybersecurity education, over the past several years, Norwich University undergraduate students have been supporting and mentoring the Cyber Patriot Team at the Northfield Middle and High School. Through Norwich’s Cyber P3i partnership with the U.S. Army Reserve and recent grant award, there is now opportunity to open the program to a larger group of students with the addition of equipment, travel costs to competitions and greater engagement with Norwich faculty and students.

As a well-recognized world leader in the field of cybersecurity training and education, Norwich is one of six universities in the nation to partner with the United States Army Reserve in a public/private effort called Cyber Private Public Partnership Initiative (P3i), which is focused on fostering the intellectual development of next generation of cybersecurity professionals.

“Our missions are one in the same: to educate the next cyber intelligence professionals, both in the armed forces, government and private sector,” said William Clements, vice president and dean of the College of Graduate and Continuing Studies. “Our nation requires these trained professionals to counter and eliminate emerging threats and risks. Norwich is committed to developing the next generation of cyber soldiers.”

Through the grant, Norwich University Applied Research Institutes (NUARI) will provide curriculum development in support of both undergraduate and graduate programs. The online graduate certificate offerings will see significant enhancements to aid the hands-on experience for students enrolled. NUARI will also develop reusable modules, or units, to support and integrate a critical infrastructure response and recovery exercise using the DECIDE™ platform.

“Norwich has a great responsibility to meet the demands of the cyber industry’s shortage of professionals,” said Phil Susmann, president of Norwich University Applied Research Institutes (NUARI) and vice president of Strategic Partnerships. “Since receiving the opportunity to serve with the USAR, we’ve been on the fast track to be as effective as we can. From building a gateway for high school students right here in Vermont to upgrading our campus facilities to educating cyber soldiers via our online distance-learning programs.”

In support of the USAR, Norwich initiatives will be focused on its successes as a nationally recognized National Security Administration (NSA) cyber education Center of Academic Excellence (CAE) by forging ahead with these four elements: scholarship for service, curriculum development, capacity building and community outreach.

About Norwich University Cyber Security Education

Ranked #2 by the Ponemon Institute for cybersecurity in the U.S., Norwich University programs are consistently ranked among the best in the nation for cybersecurity education.

Norwich University is recognized as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Education by the National Security Agency (NSA) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and has received designation as a Center of Digital Forensics Academic Excellence (CDFAE) by the Defense Cyber Crime Center (DC3).

Beginning in 2002, Norwich University became a member of what is now called National Science Foundation’s Cyber Corps: Scholarship for Service program.

Norwich recently announced it has officially partnered with the United States Army Reserves (USAR) to develop cyber-education curricula that align with federal standards and cybersecurity needs.

In February 2016 the Norwich University cybersecurity program was the only educational institution to be invited to support Super Bowl 50.

Most recently Norwich’s online graduate program was named one of the top ten best cybersecurity graduate programs in the country by Universities.com.

In October 2016 Norwich University participated in National Cybersecurity Awareness Month by dedicating the month to cybersecurity training, bringing in speakers and running contests in security knowledge, among other activities.

BY DAPHNE LARKIN
NU Office of Communications

May 24, 2017

NORTHFIELD, Vt. — Norwich University’s Peace and War Center presents Fulbright scholar and Russia and cyber security expert Dr. Pierre Jolicoeur for a presentation, “Russia: Understanding Foreign Policy and Cybersecurity” on at 1:45 p.m. May 1 in Milano Ballroom.

Free and open to the public, the presentation will be followed by a Q&A.

Jolicoeur is this semester’s Fulbright Visiting Research Chair in the Peace and War Center. The program between Fulbright Canada and Norwich University establishes a Fulbright Visiting Research Chair in Peace and War Studies at Norwich University annually to focus on research pertaining to military and diplomatic affairs. Norwich funding for this program comes from a generous gift from Norwich Trustee J. Fred Weintz Jr. ’47.

Jolicoeur received his PhD in political science at Université du Québec à Montréal in 2006, after completing his first two degrees at Laval University. A specialist of the former Soviet Union and South Eastern Europe, Jolicoeur’s research focuses on secessionist movements, foreign policy, and cybersecurity.

In the past three years, Jolicoeur’s research has focused on strategic communications, digital diplomacy and information operations, where he analyzes the impact of social media on the military operating environment. He is specifically looking at how state and non-state actors use social media as strategic tools to promote their goals. His work has produced recommendations taken up by the Canadian government and distributed to NATO allies.

At Norwich, Jolicoeur’s research covers a new angle of the use (or misuse) of social media: the radicalization of Canadian and American individuals to extremist ideas (far right, far left, and religious movements) and the role of social media in that process.

Associate professor since 2011, Jolicoeur has directed the Department of Political Science of the Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC) since 2012. In 2015, he was cross-appointed with Queen’s University, where he is affiliated with the Department of Policy Studies.

At RMCC, he teaches international relations and comparative politics. He is author or co-author of two books, 10 articles in peer review journals and 24 chapters in university press. His publications, both in French and English, appear in Études Internationales, Journal of Borderland Studies, Canadian Journal of Foreign Policy, and Connections.

He also has contributed to the public debate, notably by publishing 29 articles in the Point de mire series, which he edited between 2000 and 2006, 20 op-eds (Le Devoir, La Presse, Whig Standard) and numerous interviews. He has been the RMCC representative to the Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences since 2011.

By Isabel Weinger Nielsen and Katie Nelson ’13
Norwich University Happenings | The Newsletter of the College of Liberal Arts

Fall 2015

The College of Liberal Arts established the Norwich University Peace and War Center (PAWC) in June 2015, creating a space for supporting interdisciplinary student- and faculty-based work on the many facets of peace and war. PAWC builds on the previous Center for the Study of War and Peace (CSWAP), which was housed in the Department of History and Political Science from 2005 to 2007. The CSWAP, directed by Professor Reina Pennington, was home to the Colby Military Writers’ Symposium and initiated a student internship/oral history project with veterans. The history faculty invested a great deal of effort in the previous center but ultimately did not have the financial means to continue that work. PAWC hopes to build on this already established foundation by creating a multidisciplinary umbrella under which research, workshops, simulations, and other programming can take place. Travis Morris, assistant professor of criminal justice, was named the first director of PAWC, and will oversee the center’s work in conjunction with an advisory board.

Prof. Morris holds a PhD from the University of Nebraska, an MS in criminal justice from Eastern Kentucky University, and a BA in criminology from Northern Illinois University. He was an infantry officer with the 10th Mountain Division, U.S. Army, and a police officer in Lexington, Ky. Prof. Morris teaches courses in terrorism, policing, homeland security, and criminology; his research interests include violent extremist propaganda analysis, information warfare, and comparative justice systems. He has published on the relationship between policing, peacekeeping, counter-terrorism, and counter-insurgency and has conducted ethnographic research in Yemen and published on how crime intersects with formal and informal justice systems in a socio-cultural context. Here he answers a few questions about PAWC and the reason for its creation.

What is the mission of the Peace and War Center?

The mission of the center is to promote discussions and understanding of war and its effects; to convey that there is always a relationship between peace and war; to advance interdisciplinary knowledge for students, scholars, and practitioners on the relationship between peace and war at local, national, and global levels. The center aligns with our institutional values as follows:

  • Dedicated to teamwork, leadership, creativity, and critical thinking.
  • Respects the right to diverse points of view as a cornerstone of our democracy.
  • Stresses self-discipline, personal responsibility, and respect for the law.
  • Purposes to advance NU’s reputation.
  • How will the Center function?

The center will take a multidisciplinary approach and will support research, creative works, and public presentations with the goal of considering the broad array of perspectives that relate to peace and war. The center will function as a combination of a networking organization and a collaborative space for students and faculty.

Will faculty benefit from the center?

The center will provide opportunities for faculty across campus to network and collaborate on research and funding for interdisciplinary projects related to peace and war. The center will also provide a venue for faculty and students to showcase their scholarship through presentations, panels, and displays. It is our hope that the center will help faculty broaden research and networking fields, forging new relationships not only with other university departments, but also outside institutions—both inside the U.S. and abroad.

What opportunities will the Center provide for students?

The primary goal of the center is to provide students with additional opportunities to advance their academic interests. Specifically, we see the center as a base for students to collaborate with NU faculty and staff in pursuing research, accessing internships, and developing independent projects. In addition, students will have opportunities to represent Norwich locally and nationally by taking on leadership roles that combine academic and practical work. We expect the center to be an academic resource to support the overall intellectual culture of the university and build leadership capacity through a variety of experiences including:

  • Conferences
  • Internships
  • Study or travel abroad opportunities
  • Networking
  • Students affiliated with the center will take on leadership roles in activities the center promotes. For example, students will be provided opportunities for conceiving conference topics and also playing an instrumental role in making them happen.

Can you give me some examples of Center-related work?

In fall 2014, the center sponsored the “United States Grand Strategy Conference’” a two-day gathering of delegates from the U.S. military, think-tanks, businesses, and academia, as well as faculty and students from Norwich.

In spring 2015, the Center held a series of four panel discussions on “Current Affairs and National Security,” which included Norwich faculty and students as well as members of the U.S. military, a journalist, and two Norwich trustees. Norwich students and faculty were key players at all events, and were given the opportunity to discuss a variety of topics with “outside “experts in the field. More information about this event can be found here.

What are the center’s plans for the coming year?

  • “Leadership in the 21st Century,” a series of podcast interviews with all 2016 U.S. presidential candidates will be hosted by Sarwar Kashmeri, adjunct professor in political science at Norwich and fellow, Foreign Policy Association. The candidates will be asked questions about policy and leadership; questions will be determined by a survey of students and faculty.
  • “Perspectives on War and Peace” courses are in the planning stages and will center on conflict and the relationship between peace and war abroad. The course is planned to occur during “Maymester” and will include a trip to a country that has experienced different forms of conflict and instability, such as Israel, Senegal, or Ireland. The course will begin with an intensive three- or four-day seminar at Norwich and will contextualize the material abroad.
  • Host a Fulbright scholar from Canada in spring 2016 which will be chosen through a special competition. The appointment of this position comes with a $25,000 award, provided most generously by Mr. Fred Weintz, Jr. and family, access to all Norwich University resources, including Smithsonian Institution materials (Norwich is a Smithsonian Affiliate), and the Norwich University Museum archives.
  • Help connect students with internship opportunities; such as the White House Internship Program.
  • A NATO Advanced Training Course (ATC) in December 2015 is being coordinated by General Mihailo Apostolski Military Academy in Macedonia and NU’s Peace and War Center. This NATO ATC, “Countering the South-East European (SEE) Terrorist Threat,” will feature speakers from NATO and partner countries that will share their research and practices with SEE scholars and governmental officials.
  • During the academic year, four panel discussions will be held: Ethnic Conflict and Violence, Peace Keeping, Violent Extremism, and Conflict Resolution/Restorative Justice.

Closing thoughts?

The Peace and War Center will be forming an advisory board composed of faculty across campus to assist in helping make this a productive and successful first year. A website is currently under construction.

 

Guest speaker David Ratner of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy visited Judith Stallings-Ward’s Imaging Global Migration Today class on Feb. 12, 2018, to speak about his experience with rescue operations of migrants at sea.

“I really liked the way he addressed the issue of rescue operations at sea from both a humanitarian and a professional perspective,” said junior International Studies major Taylor Nash. “You could tell he really cared about these people’s lives and wanted to help them, yet at the same time, he held himself to high professional standards to uphold the laws at sea.”

Norwich News

  • All
  • Alumni News
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  • Breaking News
  • Campus Life
  • Faculty News
  • Leadership
  • Norwich In Photos
  • Norwich In The News
  • Norwich In The News
  • Norwich On The Road
  • President's Message
  • Service
  • Special Events
  • Student Experience
  • Student Life
  • Student Success
  • Default
  • Title
  • Date
  • Random
  • 'So Much to be Thankful for'

    'So Much to be Thankful for'

    • President's Message
  • Norwich students on Boston Policy Excursion learn about hurricane and disaster preparedness

    Norwich students on Boston Policy Excursion learn about hurricane and disaster preparedness

    • Student Experience
  • President Anarumo featured as part of Dartmouth College's Veterans Day Observances on Thursday, Nov. 10.

    President Anarumo featured as part of Dartmouth College's Veterans Day Observances on Thursday, Nov. 10.

    • Norwich On The Road
  • Norwich University Veterans Day observance to feature Lt. Gen. Thomas Bussiere.

    Norwich University Veterans Day observance to feature Lt. Gen. Thomas Bussiere.

    • Special Events
  • Women's Volleyball's Sarah Farnum named Setter of the Week by the Great Northeast Athletic Conference (GNAC)

    Women's Volleyball's Sarah Farnum named Setter of the Week by the Great Northeast Athletic Conference (GNAC)

    • Athletics News
  • Men's Rugby advances to NEWCRC Conference Championship on Nov. 4 vs. UVM.

    Men's Rugby advances to NEWCRC Conference Championship on Nov. 4 vs. UVM.

    • Athletics News
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