This is the place for Norwich faculty, students, and alumni to contribute their stories on and off The Hill. You’ll read the stories and see the images from the projects, connections and successes that make Norwich’s community vibrant and vital.

Aerial Norwich Campus View in early spring

SPECIAL EDITION: Thinking about COVID-19? So is Norwich faculty.

Everyone is adapting to new realities as we learn to work remotely, educate students and serve people in need and this transition has stimulated intellectual curiosities. Norwich has a series of interdisciplinary essays featuring faculty members’ perspectives on the coronavirus to help us all think through the consequences our nation is facing.

There is a lot of discussion within today’s military establishment about Great Power competition. The most recent National Defense Strategy reflects this, as do many blogs and op-eds geared toward America’s national security professionals.

Nuclear weapons have not been used in warfare since the 1945 bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Japan. (Image by iStock.)

On Jan. 22, the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW) came into force. The fact that this treaty, which prohibits nuclear weapons, went into effect is a huge milestone for the nuclear disarmament movement.

Lincoln Memorial at night. (Image by iStock.)

Academic study of reconciliation in the last three decades has focused on converting the process of enmity to amity in virtually every corner of the world, from Europe to Africa, Southeast and Northeast Asia to Latin America.

The inauguration of Joseph R. Biden Jr. on Jan. 20 was an historic event, coming on the heels of an attack on the Capitol. The transition of power occurred amid a global pandemic with heightened security and a departing president refusing to attend.

Many examples in history highlight the brave acts of people, including those during the 9/11 attacks. On Flight 93, passengers' fates were doomed after terrorists had hijacked their plane. The last minutes of those who boarded were spent fighting back to regain control of the flight, hoping to save the lives of many more.

Since he came to power in 2012, North Korean leader Kim Jong-un has faced a dilemma: for his long-term regime’s survival and security, Kim desperately needs substantial economic reforms and opening measures, as China and Vietnam have both done.

The tumultuous conversation about race at Virginia Military Institute (VMI) should lead to some serious soul-searching at military colleges across the United States.

Daniel Freitag’s Corps of Cadets uniform cap sits atop his stripped bunk in March. In his essay, Freitag wrote that he felt as empty as the room as he moved out of campus amid the abruptly halted semester. (Photo courtesy Daniel Freitag.)

2020 graduate laments missing his class’s celebratory coda

EDITORS NOTE: This story, adapted from a post on Facebook, has been edited for length and presentation.

I recently departed Norwich on a uniquely somber occasion. I left May 2, which was supposed to be my class’s grand finale. A graduation and commencement that had been hyped heatedly and toward which we’d worked tirelessly since our 2016 arrival had been canceled because of an unprecedented global crisis. Little can be said to make up for it, but I hope with what I have written here, my fellow classmates and cadets can carry on with the same spirit and energy that earned us that day.

Professor Huw Read, director of the Center for Cybersecurity and Forensics Education and Research, aka CyFER, works with Norwich University cybersecurity students on campus in 2015. Students in his information assurance classes credit him with helping them learn skills that eased the transition to remote learning during the coronavirus mitigation shutdown. (Photo by Mark Collier.)

Cybersecurity majors reflect on securing remote networks, transitioning to online learning in COVID-mitigation campus shutdown

The coronavirus crisis couldn’t stop Norwich University’s semester. With traditional moxie, faculty and students set up at home, mastering GoToMeetings, webinar-style lessons and remote learning. The transition wouldn’t have worked without ingenuity, but it also wouldn’t have happened without technology, and the internet.

Norwich engineering graduate and Master of Business Administration degree recipient Brian Griffin’s engineering firm helped complete several rooms in St. Luke’s Hospital in New Bedford, New Hampshire. The hospital was on coronavirus pandemic front line, serve in influx of patients. (Photo courtesy Brian Griffin.)

In show of service, pair of Norwich graduates support delivery of critical coronavirus care

As scores of Norwich graduates will attest, “I will try,” Norwich University’s war-forged motto, resonates on campus and off, in everyday life and in crisis. This spring, the words inspired a pair of Norwich graduates involved in Northeastern U.S. efforts to mitigate the coronavirus pandemic.

Coronavirus pandemic reminds us that global challenges are best solved through rigorous scholarly experimentation, innovation

Over the past few weeks, Norwich University faculty have used their areas of expertise as frameworks to deliver perspectives on the COVID-19 pandemic and its unprecedented crisis. What unites these voices is their emphasis on the power of research to shed light on today’s challenges and to formulate potential solutions to global problems. As teacher-scholars engaging students in research, it is more crucial than ever that Norwich University stand by its commitment to supporting faculty research and innovative curriculum development to prepare students to find novel solutions to the world’s new challenges.

Coronavirus, global warming are parallel problems we can conquer, if we act

In my native country of India, pink flamingos descended upon the once bustling city of Navi, Mumbai, in numbers never seen before — reports say as many as 150,000 or a 25% increase. Farther north in Punjab, people can now marvel at views of the snowcapped Himalayas, something that hasn’t been possible for decades.

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