The authors of this forum, Voices on Peace and War (VPW), explore domestic and global issues broadly tied to the theme of peace and war. Sponsored by the John and Mary Frances Patton Peace & War Center of Norwich University, VPW features subject matter experts and students who present their opinions and arguments on critical issues related to peace and war in the international community. As the image with many candles symbolizes, we hope that a chorus of small voices in this forum will help illuminate a world filled with a variety of complex challenges.

Co-editor: Yangmo Ku, Associate Director, Peace & War Center | Co-editor: Daniel A. Morris, Assistant Professor of Philosophy |
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Disclaimer: These opinion pieces represent the authors’ personal views, and do not necessarily reflect the official policies or positions of Norwich University or PAWC.

On 17 January, 2021, the United States military has confirmed the troop withdrawal in Somalia is complete.[1] However, the goals of good governance, stability and accountable security forces are not satisfied.[2] What gives?

U.S. policy toward the North Korean nuclear weapons program over the past three decades has tended to swing between imposing sanctions in order to impede, slow down or force Pyongyang to reverse its nuclear pursuit, and displaying “strategic patience” by shunning the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) altogether, at times outsourcing diplomatic initiatives to other stakeholders such as China.

I expect to be dead by 2050. I hope my children will live comfortably beyond that and some of my students to the end of the century, but it seems unlikely.

Chinese military aircraft and warships have been entering the airspace and waters around the Korean Peninsula and the seas between South Korea and Japan more frequently since late 2017.

There is a lot of discussion within today’s military establishment about Great Power competition. The most recent National Defense Strategy reflects this, as do many blogs and op-eds geared toward America’s national security professionals.

Nuclear weapons have not been used in warfare since the 1945 bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Japan. (Image by iStock.)

On Jan. 22, the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW) came into force. The fact that this treaty, which prohibits nuclear weapons, went into effect is a huge milestone for the nuclear disarmament movement.

Lincoln Memorial at night. (Image by iStock.)

Academic study of reconciliation in the last three decades has focused on converting the process of enmity to amity in virtually every corner of the world, from Europe to Africa, Southeast and Northeast Asia to Latin America.

The inauguration of Joseph R. Biden Jr. on Jan. 20 was an historic event, coming on the heels of an attack on the Capitol. The transition of power occurred amid a global pandemic with heightened security and a departing president refusing to attend.

Many examples in history highlight the brave acts of people, including those during the 9/11 attacks. On Flight 93, passengers' fates were doomed after terrorists had hijacked their plane. The last minutes of those who boarded were spent fighting back to regain control of the flight, hoping to save the lives of many more.

The 2021 Edition of the Journal of Peace and War Studies (JPWS)

2021 cover to the peace and war journal

The 2021 issue of the Journal of Peace and War Studies gives special focus to the theme, “Preparing Military Leaders to Effectively Resolve 21st Century Security Challenges.” Its publication and theme coincide with the 2021 International Symposium of Military Academies (ISOMA), which took place October 4-8, 2021, at Norwich University.

Read online or download the 2021 JPWS Journal

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