Fourth Annual Information Assurance Student Symposium
Held at Norwich University

The fourth annual Information Assurance Student Symposium at Norwich University was held on March 29 in the Milano Ballroom. The event featured ten student speakers from Norwich University, three from Champlain College, two from Dartmouth College, and one from the University of Vermont.

The fourth annual Information Assurance Student Symposium at Norwich University was held on March 29 in the Milano Ballroom. The event featured ten student speakers from Norwich University, three from Champlain College, two from Dartmouth College, and one from the University of Vermont. The symposium was sponsored by Norwich University's Online Graduate Program and the Division of Business and Management.

Norwich student presentations at the day-long symposium were:

The fourth annual Information Assurance Student Symposium at Norwich University was held on March 29 in the Milano Ballroom. The event featured ten student speakers from Norwich University, three from Champlain College, two from Dartmouth College, and one from the University of Vermont.Eric Nichols, "Managing Red Teams," a discussion of the significant studies of Red Teams - independent groups hired to determine the vulnerability of computer systems. The talk summarized key concepts and issues for effective use of Red Team methodologies in information assurance.

Bryce Porter, "Zero-Day Exploits," which studied the timing of vulnerability announcements, patch releases, and exploit discoveries in an attempt to determine whether or not traditional patch management processes will continue to be an option for information assurance practitioners, or if zero-day exploits will someday negate the protections they provide.

Lofton Newton, "The Surveillance Society," a talk that reviewed the issue of how much surveillance is too much surveillance, and asked the question whether or not it is in the best interest of society for our government to have unmonitored access to databases storing library records, purchases at the corner convenience store, or records of our telephone calls.

Michael Dao, "Global Pandemics and Information Assurance," a research project studying the implications of the current threat of H5N1 "Bird Flu" for information assurance. This work addressed the future needs of having businesses form relationships with nearby hospitals and heads of local departments of health as well as reformulation disaster recovery plans.

Jeremy Wood, "Lessons Learned from Setting Up a Network Attack/Defense Lab," a presentation which detailed the tasks necessary for setting up software and hardware to teach and develop the material to teach.

Karthik Raman, Corey French, and Krenar Komoni, "IA Applications of Network Data Sonorization," which addressed the increasingly difficult task of analyzing and recognizing log data items that indicate a pending attack on a computer network.

Akhan Almagambetov, "Legal Aspects of Open Wireless Access Points," which questioned the ethical, legal, and security aspects of wireless Internet.

"The 4th annual symposium was a success on all levels," said Mich Kabay, Associate Professor of Information Assurance and organizer of the event. "The speakers enjoyed the opportunity to present professional-quality summaries of their research to an interested audience of information assurance professionals and to faculty and students from Norwich University, Champlain College, Dartmouth College, and the University of Vermont. We are looking forward to another exciting symposium next year."