Leadership from horsemanship: Cavalry Troop keeps legacy alive, page two: Norwich University emagazine

Confidence was the goal on a chilly afternoon inside the farm’s cavernous indoor arena. In the middle of the newly raked riding space, senior Kelly Stewart guided sophomore Josh Szakal, who was astride Galahad, with the aid of a rope. It’s a technique called longeing, and is useful in helping new riders grow more comfortable. As Stewart, executive officer of Cavalry Troop, guided the horse’s pace in a tight circle, Szakal dropped the reins and reached to touch his toes and the animal’s tail. She urged him not to grab the saddle.

“Try it without holding on first,” said Stewart. “Make sure your heels are down. Sink your heels lower. Good.”

For Stewart, who had little riding experience before arriving at Norwich, where students choose a military or traditional college lifestyle, the big lesson horses provide is trust. continue

[Top] A member of Cavalry Troop prepares a horse for riding. [Bottom] Two members of the company perform on the Upper Parade Ground on Norwich’s campus at Homecoming in the fall of 2008.

[Top] A member of Cavalry Troop prepares a horse for riding. [Bottom] Two members of the company perform on the Upper Parade Ground on Norwich’s campus at Homecoming in the fall of 2008.